Tuesday , February 20 2018
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To complain about Lidl’s peeled onions means you think someone would like them

Summary:
There's a certain paradox in complaining about what you insist no one will want:Supermarket giant Lidl has faced a backlash for selling pre-peeled "naked" onions in plastic packaging.There is no point in complaining about, nor campaigning against, what you insist no one will or could want. For, in a market economy, if no one wants it then it will quickly enough disappear for lack of demand.It is only if you think that people will buy it but that they shouldn't that there is a case for banning or saying that people shouldn't.As with, say, a new supermarket. If everyone does indeed want to shop in the High Street then the existence of the new and larger store will make no difference. It is only if you think they won't shop at and therefore maintain the High Street that you have a case for

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There's a certain paradox in complaining about what you insist no one will want:

Supermarket giant Lidl has faced a backlash for selling pre-peeled "naked" onions in plastic packaging.

There is no point in complaining about, nor campaigning against, what you insist no one will or could want. For, in a market economy, if no one wants it then it will quickly enough disappear for lack of demand.

It is only if you think that people will buy it but that they shouldn't that there is a case for banning or saying that people shouldn't.

As with, say, a new supermarket. If everyone does indeed want to shop in the High Street then the existence of the new and larger store will make no difference. It is only if you think they won't shop at and therefore maintain the High Street that you have a case for protesting.

That case only being that people will do as they wish and you wish they wouldn't.

Peeled onions? If no one wants them then they won't be sold beyond a most limited trial. If people do then why shouldn't they have them?  

Tim Worstall
Tim Worstall is a British-born writer and Senior Fellow of the Adam Smith Institute. Worstall is a regular contributor to Forbes and the Register. He has also written for the Guardian, the New York Times, PandoDaily, the Daily Telegraph blogs, the Times, and The Wall Street Journal. In 2010 his blog was listed as one of the top 100 UK political blogs by Total Politics.

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