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Contrary to protestations climate change is at least partially solved

Summary:
We know very well, because Extinction Rebellion and St Greta keep telling us so, that the perils of climate change mean that the entire society must be overturned. For, despite our having had decades of warning we’ve not done anything yet.This is, as the phrase goes, being economical with the truth: Low-carbon power generated more than half of all electricity in the UK for the first time this summer in a major milestone as Britain seeks to become greener, new figures show. The share of energy generated from wind, solar, hydroelectric and nuclear sources grew to 51pc of total output between June and August, while fossil fuels fell to 48.5pc.Fossil fuel use hit a record low in the UK over the three-month period, as the country attempts to switch to cleaner energy and rid itself of a reliance

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We know very well, because Extinction Rebellion and St Greta keep telling us so, that the perils of climate change mean that the entire society must be overturned. For, despite our having had decades of warning we’ve not done anything yet.

This is, as the phrase goes, being economical with the truth:

Low-carbon power generated more than half of all electricity in the UK for the first time this summer in a major milestone as Britain seeks to become greener, new figures show.

The share of energy generated from wind, solar, hydroelectric and nuclear sources grew to 51pc of total output between June and August, while fossil fuels fell to 48.5pc.

Fossil fuel use hit a record low in the UK over the three-month period, as the country attempts to switch to cleaner energy and rid itself of a reliance on oil, gas and coal by 2050.

The predictions of sea rising terror come from models in which we don’t develop non-fossil fuel sources of power. Indeed, we not only use ever more fossil fuels we use ever more coal within that mix. Which isn’t, as we can all note, what is actually happening. Here in the UK at least we’re on the cusp of entirely ceasing to use thermal coal. As above, half our energy is coming from non-emitting sources.

Note what we’re not discussing here - whether climate change itself is a real problem or not. Whether electric cars are the solution, all of that sort of detail. Instead, we are simply pointing to this reality.

We have been told that we must develop non-fossil energy sources in order to beat climate change. We have done so. Therefore we are at least partially beating climate change. The protestations that we have done nothing, that all remains to be done, are simply wrong therefore, aren’t they?

In the technical jargon of these things the assumption used to describe the coming terror is that we’re on Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5. We are insistent that we’re doing much better than that. As a matter of opinion we’d argue that we’re on RCP 2.6 already - the one where climate change is a just a minor annoyance for a few decades. We’re open to a more scientific analysis which estimates whether we’re really on 2.6, or perhaps RCP 4.0 and so on. But the one thing we really do know, and all should agree upon, is that we’re not on RCP 8.5. Thus we should stop planning the world as if we are.

The difficult question becomes how do we convince the mob gluing itself to tube trains of this?

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Tim Worstall
Tim Worstall is a British-born writer and Senior Fellow of the Adam Smith Institute. Worstall is a regular contributor to Forbes and the Register. He has also written for the Guardian, the New York Times, PandoDaily, the Daily Telegraph blogs, the Times, and The Wall Street Journal. In 2010 his blog was listed as one of the top 100 UK political blogs by Total Politics.

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