Thursday , December 12 2019
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And yet we should be spending less on renewables each year

Summary:
One of those shock, horror, reports:Investment in greenhouse gas emission reduction fell last year despite the growing urgency of the climate crisis, and the benefits of outlays were cancelled out by investments globally in fossil fuels and other dirty industries, finds a report by the Climate Policy Initiative. Global climate finance hit a record high of 2bn (£476bn) in 2017, according to CPI advisers, but fell back 11% after that bumper year to 6bn in 2018.Gaia will therefore be boiled in her own salt water stock because we are not sacrificing enough to save her. Except, of course, we should be spending less on renewables each year. Because, as we keep being told, renewables are becoming cheaper. Therefore we can achieve the same amount for less sacrifice: After nearly two decades

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One of those shock, horror, reports:

Investment in greenhouse gas emission reduction fell last year despite the growing urgency of the climate crisis, and the benefits of outlays were cancelled out by investments globally in fossil fuels and other dirty industries, finds a report by the Climate Policy Initiative.

Global climate finance hit a record high of $612bn (£476bn) in 2017, according to CPI advisers, but fell back 11% after that bumper year to $546bn in 2018.

Gaia will therefore be boiled in her own salt water stock because we are not sacrificing enough to save her. Except, of course, we should be spending less on renewables each year. Because, as we keep being told, renewables are becoming cheaper. Therefore we can achieve the same amount for less sacrifice:

After nearly two decades of strong annual growth, renewables around the world added as much net capacity in 2018 as they did in 2017,

Oh, that is what is happening. The problem with this is?

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Tim Worstall
Tim Worstall is a British-born writer and Senior Fellow of the Adam Smith Institute. Worstall is a regular contributor to Forbes and the Register. He has also written for the Guardian, the New York Times, PandoDaily, the Daily Telegraph blogs, the Times, and The Wall Street Journal. In 2010 his blog was listed as one of the top 100 UK political blogs by Total Politics.

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