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We tend to think actions speak louder than words

Summary:
The Guardian publishes another of these whines about the language that people use:It’s not at the top of the list, but a fresh reason to resent Boris Johnson surfaced last week in the course of a news story about old cases of child abuse. Last year the prime minister averred that the pursuit of these cases, from the 1970s and 80s and many involving state institutions, was akin to “spaffing” money up the wall. Last week Labour called on him to apologise for the remark after the publication of new police figures indicating the abuse had been more widespread than assumed. The scandal is Johnson’s attitude, of course, but it might be observed as a side note that the word “spaffing”, which was funny for five minutes, has now been categorically ruled out for usage.The Guardian also publishes the

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The Guardian publishes another of these whines about the language that people use:

It’s not at the top of the list, but a fresh reason to resent Boris Johnson surfaced last week in the course of a news story about old cases of child abuse. Last year the prime minister averred that the pursuit of these cases, from the 1970s and 80s and many involving state institutions, was akin to “spaffing” money up the wall. Last week Labour called on him to apologise for the remark after the publication of new police figures indicating the abuse had been more widespread than assumed. The scandal is Johnson’s attitude, of course, but it might be observed as a side note that the word “spaffing”, which was funny for five minutes, has now been categorically ruled out for usage.

The Guardian also publishes the news that Boris is going to approve HS2:

Boris Johnson will give the final go-ahead to the first phase of the controversial HS2 high speed rail link early this week – despite fears over spiralling costs and strong opposition from at least 60 Tory MPs.

The prime minister is expected to make an announcement to parliament on Tuesday approving construction of the line between London and Birmingham, two days before conducting a wide-ranging reshuffle of his cabinet.

Actions and words - we tend to think that spaffing £100 billion and change on a project that shouldn’t be done in the first place matters more than the use of the word spaffing. But obviously that’s just us and our pickiness.

Although we would suggest a deal. The Prime Minister gets to use whatever language he likes as long as he’s rather more careful with our money. Who knows, could be the latest revolution in politics.

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Tim Worstall
Tim Worstall is a British-born writer and Senior Fellow of the Adam Smith Institute. Worstall is a regular contributor to Forbes and the Register. He has also written for the Guardian, the New York Times, PandoDaily, the Daily Telegraph blogs, the Times, and The Wall Street Journal. In 2010 his blog was listed as one of the top 100 UK political blogs by Total Politics.

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