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Perhaps the coronavirus really does change everything

Summary:
While we were entirely happy with most aspects of society BC - Before Coronavirus - we are aware of the clamour insisting that everything must be different after it: California Gov. Gavin Newsom says 170 ventilators shipped to Los Angeles by the federal government to deal with the coronavirus crisis were “not working.” The Los Angeles Times reports that the life-saving machines from the national stockpile are now being fixed by a Silicon Valley company Newsom visited on Saturday.We are aware of the point that some things simply are not possible without government. But perhaps one of the things that will become clearer AC is that government just isn’t very good at any of the things it tries to do. The logical conclusion from that being that where we’ve alternative methods we should use

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While we were entirely happy with most aspects of society BC - Before Coronavirus - we are aware of the clamour insisting that everything must be different after it:

California Gov. Gavin Newsom says 170 ventilators shipped to Los Angeles by the federal government to deal with the coronavirus crisis were “not working.” The Los Angeles Times reports that the life-saving machines from the national stockpile are now being fixed by a Silicon Valley company Newsom visited on Saturday.

We are aware of the point that some things simply are not possible without government. But perhaps one of the things that will become clearer AC is that government just isn’t very good at any of the things it tries to do.

The logical conclusion from that being that where we’ve alternative methods we should use those rather than government. Saving the enforced collectivism for those moments and actions where There Is No Alternative.

When we add the already known point that there are many things that government - that enforced collectivism - cannot do at all then we’ll end up with very much less government than we have now. Which would be a useful silver lining, wouldn’t it?

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Tim Worstall
Tim Worstall is a British-born writer and Senior Fellow of the Adam Smith Institute. Worstall is a regular contributor to Forbes and the Register. He has also written for the Guardian, the New York Times, PandoDaily, the Daily Telegraph blogs, the Times, and The Wall Street Journal. In 2010 his blog was listed as one of the top 100 UK political blogs by Total Politics.

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