Sunday , July 12 2020
Home / Tim Worstall /Can’t we all be Keynesian about this?

Can’t we all be Keynesian about this?

Summary:
This may have been more than a little impolitic but can’t we all agree on one thing? Environmental advocates have reacted with outrage after a provincial energy minister in Canada said that coronavirus restrictions on public gatherings make it a “great time” to push on with a contentious pipeline project. During a podcast hosted by the Canadian Association of Oilwell Drilling Contractors, Alberta’s energy minister Sonya Savage was asked about the Trans Mountain expansion project, which is under construction despite despite fierce opposition from environmentalists and some Indigenous groups.“Now is a great time to be building a pipeline because you can’t have protests of more than 15 people,” Savage said.“People are not going to have tolerance and patience for protests that get in the way

Topics:
Tim Worstall considers the following as important:

This could be interesting, too:

Tyler Durden writes First Federal Execution In 17 Years Halted On Coronavirus Fears

Tyler Durden writes Binney & Sullivan: An Open Letter Challenge To Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey On Censorship

Tyler Durden writes Coronavirus: The Under-40s Dilemma

Tyler Durden writes LA Teachers Union Says Schools Can’t Reopen Unless Charter Schools Get Shut-Down, Police Defunded

This may have been more than a little impolitic but can’t we all agree on one thing?

Environmental advocates have reacted with outrage after a provincial energy minister in Canada said that coronavirus restrictions on public gatherings make it a “great time” to push on with a contentious pipeline project.

During a podcast hosted by the Canadian Association of Oilwell Drilling Contractors, Alberta’s energy minister Sonya Savage was asked about the Trans Mountain expansion project, which is under construction despite despite fierce opposition from environmentalists and some Indigenous groups.

“Now is a great time to be building a pipeline because you can’t have protests of more than 15 people,” Savage said.

“People are not going to have tolerance and patience for protests that get in the way of people working. People need jobs and those types of ideological protests that get in the way are not going to be tolerated by ordinary Canadians.”

Her comments prompted disbelief and indignation among environmentalists.

It is a standard application of crude Keynesianism that troubled economic times are exactly when we should go build all that lovely infrastructure. You know, the multiplier effect and all that. Even - as Krugman with the alien defence system even if aliens don’t exist - that spending upon something entirely wasteful and useless still makes us richer because Keynes.

Now the insistence is that it does matter what is built. We agree - it does matter what is built. The what, the why, the wherefore, they always matter. Even if we accept - which we usually don’t - the existence of that multiplier it still does matter what is built and whether it is useful in and of itself.

Which is very cool - we now need to examine each and every idea for government spending as to whether the thing being spent upon is worth having in itself, it is no longer enough to just shout “Stimulus!” Or at least that would be true if these people were consistent and perhaps we should hold them to being so?

Media enquiries: 07584 778207 (Call only, 24 hour)

Tim Worstall
Tim Worstall is a British-born writer and Senior Fellow of the Adam Smith Institute. Worstall is a regular contributor to Forbes and the Register. He has also written for the Guardian, the New York Times, PandoDaily, the Daily Telegraph blogs, the Times, and The Wall Street Journal. In 2010 his blog was listed as one of the top 100 UK political blogs by Total Politics.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *