Wednesday , October 21 2020
Home / Tim Worstall /Tax Justice UK seem to have a problem with numbers

Tax Justice UK seem to have a problem with numbers

Summary:
Or perhaps it is logic that’s escaping them. We’re told that their focus groups produce the information that everyone’s entirely willing to pay more tax to gain more of that lovely state goodness. Which is a bit of a problem for the other major work of Tax Justice UK, complaining about how many people dodge too much of the bill for lovely state goodness. But let us leave that little difficulty aside. We all all for more tax they say. Except:According to our research, 74% of people want to see the wealthy taxed more, including 64% of Conservative voters. The proportion of Conservatives who said they were personally prepared to pay more tax went up from 41% in March to 46% in June. Conservative backing for an increase in corporation tax leaped from 61% to 74% over the same period.Ah, no, you

Topics:
Tim Worstall considers the following as important:

This could be interesting, too:

David Stockman writes DUMP TRUMP: Why Conservatives Should Punt On Nov. 3rd

David Stockman writes A True Conservative’s November Writ

Tyler Durden writes Sperry Exposes The Complete History Of Hunter Biden’s Crony-Connected Jobs

Tyler Durden writes Indian Army Captures Chinese Soldier Who ‘Strayed’ Across Ladakh Border

Or perhaps it is logic that’s escaping them. We’re told that their focus groups produce the information that everyone’s entirely willing to pay more tax to gain more of that lovely state goodness. Which is a bit of a problem for the other major work of Tax Justice UK, complaining about how many people dodge too much of the bill for lovely state goodness. But let us leave that little difficulty aside.

We all all for more tax they say. Except:

According to our research, 74% of people want to see the wealthy taxed more, including 64% of Conservative voters. The proportion of Conservatives who said they were personally prepared to pay more tax went up from 41% in March to 46% in June. Conservative backing for an increase in corporation tax leaped from 61% to 74% over the same period.

Ah, no, you see that’s a minority in favour of paying more tax. It’s a majority in favour of other people paying more tax. Which really isn’t the same thing at all, is it?

As ever the answer depends upon the specific question asked. “Would you pay more tax to fund diversity advisers?” gains a different answer from “Should he, over there, pay more tax to fund you?”

Media enquiries: 07584 778207 (Call only, 24 hour)

Tim Worstall
Tim Worstall is a British-born writer and Senior Fellow of the Adam Smith Institute. Worstall is a regular contributor to Forbes and the Register. He has also written for the Guardian, the New York Times, PandoDaily, the Daily Telegraph blogs, the Times, and The Wall Street Journal. In 2010 his blog was listed as one of the top 100 UK political blogs by Total Politics.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *