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The boss of Uber might well be right here

Summary:
The boss of Uber claims that the people who work for the company as drivers prefer the flexibility or independence of the manner of working to the possibly benefits of being classified as either workers or employees. He might be right too: The chief executive of Uber has insisted that its drivers want flexibility above the benefits of employment in the wake of a landmark UK court ruling that classified them as workers. Dara Khosrowshahi, who has run the taxi-hailing app since 2017, said its 3.9m drivers across the world "overwhelmingly" value changeable hours as their first priority, without addressing the UK case directly.There are jobs out there which do not offer the flexibility. There are jobs out there that do offer those benefits of other employment statuses (statii?).That people -

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The boss of Uber claims that the people who work for the company as drivers prefer the flexibility or independence of the manner of working to the possibly benefits of being classified as either workers or employees. He might be right too:

The chief executive of Uber has insisted that its drivers want flexibility above the benefits of employment in the wake of a landmark UK court ruling that classified them as workers.

Dara Khosrowshahi, who has run the taxi-hailing app since 2017, said its 3.9m drivers across the world "overwhelmingly" value changeable hours as their first priority, without addressing the UK case directly.

There are jobs out there which do not offer the flexibility. There are jobs out there that do offer those benefits of other employment statuses (statii?).

That people - entirely voluntarily - take the jobs which offer the flexibility among the employment benefits and not the, say, holiday pay, shows that those workers value the flexibility above the holiday pay. And so on through any and every of the varied different combinations of employment benefits, including pay, hours and so on.

That people do the job, as is, shows that for those making the decision the deal is as good as is on offer, at least, elsewhere.

Now, whether people should be allowed to make their own decisions in this manner - we insist yes, of course, this is what liberty means - is another question. But given the number of people who volunteer to become Uber drivers they must be at least satisfied with the mixture of employment benefits on offer.

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Tim Worstall
Tim Worstall is a British-born writer and Senior Fellow of the Adam Smith Institute. Worstall is a regular contributor to Forbes and the Register. He has also written for the Guardian, the New York Times, PandoDaily, the Daily Telegraph blogs, the Times, and The Wall Street Journal. In 2010 his blog was listed as one of the top 100 UK political blogs by Total Politics.

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