Thursday , May 19 2022
Home / Tim Worstall /Just when we could be free

Just when we could be free

Summary:
Brexit is, of course, a controversial subject. Something that should not be controversial about it is that food prices within the EU are higher than those outside it. On the grounds that the entire Common Agricultural Policy is designed to make this be so. With food the EU is a zollverein - yes, a seamless market inside but with high walls to keep the outside out there, outside.At which point we get this:But as an island nation outside of the Continental trading bloc, the UK is going to need domestic farmers more than ever, while the pandemic was a wake-up call to the importance of food production self-sufficiency.The correct conclusion is of course entirely the opposite. We are now free of that zollverein. It is possible for us, as it wasn’t before, to tear down those tariff and quota

Topics:
Tim Worstall considers the following as important:

This could be interesting, too:

Tim Worstall writes What horrors! How could this be?

Don Boudreaux writes Elizabeth Warren Encourages Resource Waste

Don Boudreaux writes Some Non-Covid Links

Don Boudreaux writes Applauding Jeff Jacoby’s Busting of Trade-Deficit Myths

Brexit is, of course, a controversial subject. Something that should not be controversial about it is that food prices within the EU are higher than those outside it. On the grounds that the entire Common Agricultural Policy is designed to make this be so. With food the EU is a zollverein - yes, a seamless market inside but with high walls to keep the outside out there, outside.

At which point we get this:

But as an island nation outside of the Continental trading bloc, the UK is going to need domestic farmers more than ever, while the pandemic was a wake-up call to the importance of food production self-sufficiency.

The correct conclusion is of course entirely the opposite. We are now free of that zollverein. It is possible for us, as it wasn’t before, to tear down those tariff and quota barriers that locked us away from the global food markets. We can - if we so wish - enjoy the finest foods from the globally finest suppliers at our leisure. Being outside the bloc enables us to actually be an island trading nation that is.

Yes, we do grasp that there are other issues here, what about that second Range Rover for the barley baron and all that. But the idea that leaving the EU means we must grow more of our own food is an absurdity.

Don’t forget, we have actually done this before. We abolished the Corn Laws in 1846, threw the British food market open to those finest global suppliers. That’s actually when British living standards started to markedly improve after the Engels Pause. We know the idea and action works.

We’ll even concede that maybe this is something to be talked about. But as we do so we’ve got to get the facts straight in the conversation. Being outside the EU makes it easier to import more of our food. As this would lead to cheaper and better food that’s not an argument in favour of more self-sufficiency in food production, is it now?

Media enquiries: 07584 778207 (Call, Text, WhatsApp 24 hour)

Tim Worstall
Tim Worstall is a British-born writer and Senior Fellow of the Adam Smith Institute. Worstall is a regular contributor to Forbes and the Register. He has also written for the Guardian, the New York Times, PandoDaily, the Daily Telegraph blogs, the Times, and The Wall Street Journal. In 2010 his blog was listed as one of the top 100 UK political blogs by Total Politics.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *