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At last, something in The Guardian we agree with

Summary:
Well, for the first time since it left Manchester, and Manchester liberalism, behind that is:At a time when household budgets are already being squeezed, it is more important than ever that companies feel the heat of competition to force them to keep prices down. But across too much of our economy, that isn’t happening.Competition is indeed a glorious thing. It’s both what keeps prices down and also drives the productivity increases which make us all so much richer over time. This applies to corporations, of course it does, but we’d just like to note that it applies to corporations, not just companies.A corporation having wider meanings than just a company. The railway system is, for example, a corporation in the wider sense. So is whoever provides the buses. Farming as a whole in the UK

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Well, for the first time since it left Manchester, and Manchester liberalism, behind that is:

At a time when household budgets are already being squeezed, it is more important than ever that companies feel the heat of competition to force them to keep prices down. But across too much of our economy, that isn’t happening.

Competition is indeed a glorious thing. It’s both what keeps prices down and also drives the productivity increases which make us all so much richer over time. This applies to corporations, of course it does, but we’d just like to note that it applies to corporations, not just companies.

A corporation having wider meanings than just a company. The railway system is, for example, a corporation in the wider sense. So is whoever provides the buses. Farming as a whole in the UK can be thought of as a corporation - the NFU certainly acts like one often enough. All of these suffer from competition in exactly the same way that Sainsbury’s, Waitrose and Morrisons have suffered from the irruption of competition by Aldi and Lidl. Those company corporations suffered so that we consumers could benefit - because the competition keeps prices down and improves productivity. Those other corporations should too.

Which then tells us what we should do about health care of course. We can’t sell the NHS because the only revenue stream is us taxpayers so who would buy it? But then we don’t want to sell it anyway because if sold it would still be that monopoly not subject to the competition which improves prices - which here would be a smaller call on taxpayers - and productivity - here actually curing people of things that can be cured, an activity the NHS is pretty terrible at compared to other health care systems.

What we need to do is break the NHS up so that it is subject to that competition which improves prices and productivity.

How lovely of The Guardian to make our point for us.

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Tim Worstall
Tim Worstall is a British-born writer and Senior Fellow of the Adam Smith Institute. Worstall is a regular contributor to Forbes and the Register. He has also written for the Guardian, the New York Times, PandoDaily, the Daily Telegraph blogs, the Times, and The Wall Street Journal. In 2010 his blog was listed as one of the top 100 UK political blogs by Total Politics.

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