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Chris Calton

Chris Calton



Articles by Chris Calton

The Gateway Drug Myth

8 days ago

Listen to the Audio Mises Wire version of this article. Since Joe Biden’s recent announcement that he’s throwing his hat in the 2020 presidential ring, his abysmal stance on the War on Drugs has been the source of a great deal of criticism, even from those inclined to support him. Four years ago, he claimed …

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The Gateway Drug Myth

8 days ago

The Time magazine article creating “the gateway drug” myth in the 1970s provided no citations for its claims, except ambiguous references to unnamed “experts.” The evidence remains elusive forty years later. Original Article: “The Gateway Drug Myth”.

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How College Profs Push Students to Socialism

11 days ago

The true aim of these “scholar activists,” as many academics have begun calling themselves, is to propagate socialism by redefining capitalism to encompass every evil of human history. Which means they’re mostly attacking straw men. Original Article: “How College Profs Push Students to Socialism”.

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How College Profs Push Students to Socialism

15 days ago

After the collapse of the housing market in 2008, professional historians gave birth to a new sub-field of history usually referred to as “the new history of capitalism.” Economic history is hardly novel, but the new history of capitalism takes the approach that capitalism is the “thing” that needs to be explained. In the past …

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Life After Shiloh: Tory Rule

24 days ago

Season 3, Episode 54 After Grant’s army moved on from Pittsburg Landing, the horrors of the battle remained for the people living there. Focusing primarily on the story of nine-year-old Elsie Duncan, Chris recounts the terrible years that followed the Battle of Shiloh for the civilians left in its wake.  Chris Calton recounts the controversial …

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Reefer Madness: Government Efforts to Criminalize Marijuana

April 26, 2019

This episode features a talk Chris Calton gave to Auburn’s Young Americans for Liberty on April 20, as part of the Reclamation of Liberties event. In the talk, Chris offers an overview of the history of the governmental efforts to stigmatize marijuana in order to justify criminalization and draconian enforcement policies. He traces the changing narrative and …

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“A Glittering Lie” — The True Battle of Shiloh

April 19, 2019

Season 3, Episode 53 “Professor CJ” of the Dangerous History Podcast joins Chris Calton to tell the story of Shiloh from the perspective of two soldiers, from their own personal memoirs of the battle. One story follows the experiences of Henry Morton Stanley, a twenty-one-year-old Confederate. The other story involves the sixteen-year-old John Cockerill, a …

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The Battle of Shiloh, Part 4: “Tell My Mother I Died Like A Soldier”

April 11, 2019

Season 3, Episode 52 The second day of battle brought fresh Union soldiers to the battlefield. They could hardly comprehend the destruction they witnessed from the day before. The bloodshed resumed until the overwhelmed Confederates were forced to retreat to Corinth. This episode also tells the oft-neglected story of the Battle of Fallen Timbers, in …

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The Battle of Shiloh, Part 3: The Hornet’s Nest

April 6, 2019

Season 3, Episode 51 As the Union line fell back, they condensed at the bottom of a ravine. As the thousands of soldiers in each army crowded in to fight in the narrowest portion of the battlefield, the area earned the nickname “The Hornet’s Nest.” Before the day was done, thousands of men would fall, …

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The Battle of Shiloh, Part 2: The Furies of Hell

March 28, 2019

Season 3, Episode 50 At the beginning of the Battle of Shiloh, the Confederacy caught the Union by surprise. However, one Union Colonel suspected that an attack was coming, and he formed his men into a defensive line that bought the rest of the Union troops time to join the fight. Instead of a quick …

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The Battle of Shiloh, Part 1: I “Would Fight Them If They Were A Million”

March 21, 2019

Season 3, Episode 49 Following the victories at Forts Henry and Donelson, Grant’s commanding officer still wanted to remove him from command. During this time, he formed a strong friendship with William Tecumseh Sherman. As the Union army was amassing troops at Pittsburg Landing, the Confederate forces in the West were concentrating at Corinth. The …

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The Battle of Pea Ridge, Part 2: Elkhorn Tavern

March 20, 2019

Season 3, Episode 48 While Confederates were facing disaster at Leetown, General Van Dorn and his Confederates at Elkhorn Tavern were fighting the Union forces with more success. But after pushing the Union forces back on the first day of fighting, they found out that they would not be reinforced by General Ben McCulloch’s 7,000 …

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A History of Asset Forfeiture

February 28, 2019

In 1991, Maui police officers showed up at the home of Frances and Joseph Lopes. One officer showed his badge and said, “Let’s go into the house, and we will explain things to you.” Once he was inside, the explanation was simple: “We’re taking the house.” The Lopses were far from wealthy. They worked on …

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The Emergence of Grant, Part 4: Unconditional Surrender

February 28, 2019

Season 3, Episode 46 After Grant pushes the Confederates back to Fort Donelson, the southern leaders had to decide whether to attempt escape or surrender. Ultimately, the surrender was carried out in a way that created scandal for the Confederate leaders who did manage to escape, and it gave Grant the opening to earn his …

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The Emergence of Grant, Part 3: Fort Donelson

February 21, 2019

Season 3, Episode 45 The Battle of Fort Donelson would take place over several days. Waged from two fronts, the land and the river, the battle would seem to be turning in favor of the Confederates. While Ulysses S. Grant was off the battlefield consulting with the naval commander, Captain Foote, the Confederates would push …

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Eliminating Racism Won’t Eliminate Police Corruption

February 14, 2019

At 9:00 p.m. on Sunday, April 24, 1927, Sam Faulkner was already asleep in his parents’ Los Angeles home. The Faulkners were African-American, and they lived in the segregated black district of the city. Sam’s parents were sitting in the living room while their son slept. Their home was owned by their daughter, Clara Harris, …

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The Emergence of Grant, Part 2: Fort Henry

February 14, 2019

Season 3, Episode 44 By taking Fort Henry, Ulysses S. Grant and Andrew Hull Foote gained access to the Tennessee River. This waterway gave them access to the Confederate heartland, and by taking the Fort, they were able to probe deep into Alabama. This earned the Union a bounty of new supplies, and also struck …

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The Emergence of Grant, Part 1: Finding the Gateway

February 7, 2019

Season 3, Episode 43 As Lincoln grew impatient with his generals, he sent an order demanding action. In the West, Ulysses S. Grant was eager to comply, while other Union generals dithered and delayed offensive operations. Confederate forces were building forts on the Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers – Forts Henry and Donelson – and they …

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The Beauty of Consumer Reviews

January 31, 2019

F. A. Hayek’s most famous contribution to economics is probably his “knowledge problem,” which refers to the observation that knowledge in society is diffuse and free exchange allows people to benefit from knowledge they don’t personally possess. The derivative insights to this problem are enormous, and often underappreciated. These insights include recognition of how product …

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The Battle of the Ironclads, Part 5: Iron versus Iron

January 31, 2019

Season 3, Episode 42  On March 9th, 1862 – the day after the ironclad Merrimack destroyed two Union warships – the Confederate navy would meet its match in battle against the USS Monitor. Both sides would claim victory in the battle, but the true legacy would be the transformation of naval warfare across the globe. Chris …

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The Battle of the Ironclads, Part 4: Building the Monitor

January 24, 2019

Season 3, Episode 41  John Ericsson’s design for the Monitor was only a skeleton when he was awarded the contract to have it built. In a race to match the feared Merrimack, Ericsson had to quickly construct a working, combat-ready iron ship that would receive its first test in combat. If the ship proved a …

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The Battle of the Ironclads, Part 3: Inventing the Monitor

January 17, 2019

Season 3, Episode 40  The Union’s response to the Confederate ironclad was an iron warship of its own. Unlike the Merrimack, the USS Monitor was a tremendous technological innovation, nearly single-handedly designed by a Swedish engineer named John Ericsson. This episode details his incredible life and the many failures that would culminate in the successful …

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The Battle of the Ironclads, Part 2: Wood versus Iron

January 10, 2019

Season 3, Episode 39  On March 8, 1862, the ironclad Merrimack — renamed the CSS Virginia — was tested in battle against three of the Union’s most powerful wooden ships. The outcome of the battle would usher in a new age of naval warfare, in which wooden ships would be rendered entirely obsolete. Chris Calton …

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Ending the War on the Non-Drug Known as Hemp

January 9, 2019

With the recent legalization of hemp in the United States, one may ask the question of why it was ever illegal to begin with. Being a non-psychoactive form of cannabis, its uses were entirely industrial. One need not be a libertarian to recognize that the prohibition of hemp ranks among the most absurd and pointless …

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The Battle of the Ironclads, Part 1: Building the Merrimack

January 3, 2019

Season 3, Episode 38 To combat the superior size of the United States Navy, the Confederate believed that it’s best strategy was to build a technologically superior — if much smaller — Navy. The cornerstone of this strategy was to recover the USS Merrimack and plate it with iron, making it the first ironclad warship …

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The Burnside Expedition

December 27, 2018

Season 3, Episode 37  Early in 1862, General Ambrose Burnside conquered the North Carolina coast, providing an important — but often overlooked — strategic victory for the Union. Chris Calton recounts the controversial history of the Civil War. You may support this podcast financially at Mises.org/SupportHC. Subscribe today at Spotify, Google Play, iTunes, SoundCloud, Stitcher, or via RSS.

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