Saturday , September 26 2020
Home / Chris Calton
Chris Calton

Chris Calton



Articles by Chris Calton

When It Comes to Masks, There Is No “Settled Science”

July 31, 2020

A survey of the research shows that the science of mask wearing is hardly “settled.” And this up-in-the-air nature of it all is a reminder of how immoral it is to impose mandates on people, backed with state violence. This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Millian Quinteros. Original Article: …

Read More »

When It Comes to Masks, There Is No “Settled Science”

July 28, 2020

As the “fifteen days to slow the spread” continues to extend indefinitely, the issue of mask mandates has become increasingly contentious. The debate has been exacerbated by the inconsistency of the recommendations of authorities (political, scientific, and imaginary). Early in the pandemic, both the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the World Health …

Read More »

The First Socialists: The Saint-Simonians and the Utopians

July 20, 2020

While collectivism was implied in Sismondi’s idea of a “general interest,” Owen and Fourier offered the first formal expression of full socialist collectivization. This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Millian Quinteros. Original Article: “The First Socialists: The Saint-Simonians and the Utopians​​”.

Read More »

The First Socialists: The Saint-Simonians and the Utopians

July 13, 2020

At the turn of the nineteenth century, classical economics—as represented by Adam Smith in Britain and Jean-Baptiste Say in France—seemed unassailable. The American Revolution, to many people, demonstrated the failures of the old economic order of mercantilism and colonialism. The flourishing trade after the war proved protective tariffs useless, and the rise of industrial production …

Read More »

What If We Didn’t Have Police at All?

June 10, 2020

As a thought experiment, try to imagine what people would do if there were no public police forces (as was the case in most places for much of the nineteenth century). I know some people will immediately imagine widespread looting and criminality—not unlike what we’re seeing currently despite the proliferation of police forces—but the thought …

Read More »

Why It’s Rational to Fear Cops

June 10, 2020

Not all (or even most) police are needlessly violent. But it is rational to conclude, upon seeing a person in a police uniform, that this person can—if he wishes to—abuse his power with near impunity. This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Millian Quinteros. Original Article: “Why It’s Rational to …

Read More »

Why It’s Rational to Fear Cops

June 5, 2020

In economics, branding serves an important purpose. Brands allow people to economize on knowledge, a scarce resource. We make decisions with imperfect information, and brand labeling and trademarks help us navigate these decisions. As Thomas Sowell writes: When you drive into a town you have never seen before and want to get some gasoline for …

Read More »

Coerced Confessions: How the Plea Bargain Replaced Physical Torture

February 15, 2020

In 2010, Chicago police commander Jon Burge was convicted on counts of perjury and obstruction of justice and sentenced to four and a half years in prison. Although he was convicted of lying under oath, his real crime was what he was lying about. Over the course of his career, he participated in or oversaw …

Read More »

Henry Ford Did More for Workers than Unions Did

January 6, 2020

A Car for the Masses When Henry Ford came up with the Model T, his goal was to build a car for the masses. Although history teachers typically present this as pertaining to price, Ford actually had to do much more than make his automobile cheaper. In fact, when the Model T was released in …

Read More »

Bernie Sanders Wants to Kill Pro Baseball

January 2, 2020

Bernie Sanders loves baseball. He loves it so much, that when he learned of Major League Baseball’s decision to phase out 42 of their 160 minor league teams, he called for the government to pressure the MLB to keep the teams, protecting the jobs of minor league players while raising their annual salaries. He has …

Read More »

All Human Beings — Not Just Capitalists — Are Self-Interested

October 22, 2019

In Why Not Socialism?, G. A. Cohen presents the scenario of a camping trip to highlight the desirability of socialism as the best form of social organization. After outlining a trip where the friends work together to provide food and firewood, rather than engaging in the division of labor and exchanging competitively, Cohen poses his …

Read More »

Reduced Sentences in Exchange for Lies: A Government Tradition

October 9, 2019

In 1992, Mark Young was sentenced to life in prison for trafficking marijuana. His conviction came from the testimonies of two other convicted marijuana dealers who turned on Young in order to get their own sentences reduced. The two informants, Ernest Montgomery and Claude Atkinson, depicted Young as a marijuana kingpin — the primary broker …

Read More »

Bring Back the Constitution’s Prohibiton of Double Jeopardy

August 23, 2019

When Donny Clark was arrested in 1990 as part of a twenty-eight-man conspiracy to grow marijuana, he was the only defendant who refused to accept a plea bargain. Clark insisted he was innocent. Five years earlier, Clark was convicted in a Florida court for growing marijuana, but he served his time and was now working …

Read More »

Government Prosecutors Are Out of Control

August 21, 2019

When Paul Hayes was arrested in Kentucky for writing a fraudulent check, he faced his third felony charge. At the time, Kentucky had a law in effect known as the Habitual Criminal Act, which imposed a life sentence for any third-time felony conviction. The prosecutor in the case, however, was at liberty to decide whether …

Read More »

The Problem with Private Prisons Is Not that They Are Private

August 15, 2019

The Brennan Center for Justice recently published a collection of essays, all written by far-left politicians, about how the United States might solve the problem of mass incarceration. Bernie Sanders contributed an essay titled “Abolish For-Profit Prisons.” His essay should come as no surprise; during the 2016 election, he made headlines after proposing the Justice …

Read More »

Federal Judges Are Waging War on the Fourth Amendment

August 8, 2019

In 1984, as part of Ronald Reagan’s renewed war on drugs, the Drug Enforcement Administration launched Operation Pipeline. This program was inspired by the strategies employed by state troopers in New Mexico who, after pulling somebody over, asked specific questions designed to determine whether the driver might be a drug trafficker. Combined with the financial …

Read More »

How Qualified Immunity Became Absolute Immunity for Police Officers

August 1, 2019

When Israel Leija, Jr. was picking up food at a drive-through in 2010, police officers approached his car to arrest him. Leija was guilty of violating his probation, and when the officers informed him that he was under arrest, he sped away. For the next twenty minutes, Leija led the police on a high speed …

Read More »

Inflation: The Soviet Tool for Destroying Money

June 19, 2019

In March 1919, the Communist Party headed by Vladimir Lenin stated in its newly drafted program that among the party objectives was the complete abolition of money. The State Bank of Russia would be “abolished and turned into the central bookkeeping office of the Communist society.”1 In theory, the ruling party could have simply decreed …

Read More »

The Gateway Drug Myth

May 18, 2019

Listen to the Audio Mises Wire version of this article. Since Joe Biden’s recent announcement that he’s throwing his hat in the 2020 presidential ring, his abysmal stance on the War on Drugs has been the source of a great deal of criticism, even from those inclined to support him. Four years ago, he claimed …

Read More »

The Gateway Drug Myth

May 18, 2019

The Time magazine article creating “the gateway drug” myth in the 1970s provided no citations for its claims, except ambiguous references to unnamed “experts.” The evidence remains elusive forty years later. Original Article: “The Gateway Drug Myth”.

Read More »

How College Profs Push Students to Socialism

May 15, 2019

The true aim of these “scholar activists,” as many academics have begun calling themselves, is to propagate socialism by redefining capitalism to encompass every evil of human history. Which means they’re mostly attacking straw men. Original Article: “How College Profs Push Students to Socialism”.

Read More »

How College Profs Push Students to Socialism

May 11, 2019

After the collapse of the housing market in 2008, professional historians gave birth to a new sub-field of history usually referred to as “the new history of capitalism.” Economic history is hardly novel, but the new history of capitalism takes the approach that capitalism is the “thing” that needs to be explained. In the past …

Read More »

Life After Shiloh: Tory Rule

May 2, 2019

Season 3, Episode 54 After Grant’s army moved on from Pittsburg Landing, the horrors of the battle remained for the people living there. Focusing primarily on the story of nine-year-old Elsie Duncan, Chris recounts the terrible years that followed the Battle of Shiloh for the civilians left in its wake.  Chris Calton recounts the controversial …

Read More »

Reefer Madness: Government Efforts to Criminalize Marijuana

April 26, 2019

This episode features a talk Chris Calton gave to Auburn’s Young Americans for Liberty on April 20, as part of the Reclamation of Liberties event. In the talk, Chris offers an overview of the history of the governmental efforts to stigmatize marijuana in order to justify criminalization and draconian enforcement policies. He traces the changing narrative and …

Read More »