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Ryan McMaken

Ryan McMaken

Ryan W. McMaken is the editor of Mises Daily and The Austrian. He has degrees in economics and political science from the University of Colorado, and was the economist for the Colorado Division of Housing from 2009 to 2014.

Articles by Ryan McMaken

Money-Supply Growth Remained Sluggish in May

20 days ago

Money supply growth inched up in May, rising slightly above March’s and April’s growth levels. But overall growth levels remain quite low compared to growth rates experienced from 2009 to 2016. March’s growth rate, for examples, was at a 12-year (145-month) low. In May, year-over-year growth in the money supply was at 2.21 percent. That …

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Why Are Progressives so Bad at Governing?

26 days ago

In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, Paul Krugman declared that the Bush administration failed in its response to the flooding of New Orleans because the administration consisted of people, according to Krugman, who didn’t “believe in government.” One cannot say that about progressives who truly believe in government, and believe in unlimited government at that. …

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Bernie and Ocasio-Cortez Declare War on the Poor

27 days ago

By slapping new regulations on high-interest credit cards, Bernie and Ocasio-Cortez will just prevent high-risk borrowers from getting loans. Original Article: “Bernie and Ocasio-Cortez Declare War on the Poor With Anti-Credit-Card Law”.

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Homelessness and the Failure of Urban Renewal

27 days ago

Homelessness today is often blamed on both “gentrification” and “neoliberalism.” When these terms are used in the context of urban housing, it is usually implied that too much market freedom makes housing unaffordable to large swaths of the population. Thus, we are told capitalism is the primary culprit we now find in many large cities …

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Iran: America’s Latest Drive for War

27 days ago

This week, two oil tankers exploded in the Persian Gulf, reportedly as a result of a limpet mine attack. Neither tanker flew a US flag. One was Panama-flagged, and the other was Marshall Islands-flagged. No one was killed. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo immediately accused the Iranian regime of being responsible for the attack. Pompeo …

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Article Submission Guidelines for Mises Wire

27 days ago

[Revised June 18, 2019] Are you interested in submitting an article for publication at Mises Wire? Here are the basic guidelines. 1. Please use the phrase “Mises Wire submission” in your subject line. Feel free to add a few words about the topic, but be sure the phrase “Mises Wire submission” is in there. 2. …

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The US Supreme Court Is Right to Rule In Favor of Tribal Sovereignty

June 2, 2019

Last week, the Supreme Court ruled the legal rights of members of the Crow tribe are not void simply because a US state tries to legislate them away. In the case of Herrera v. Wyoming, the US Supreme court overturned the lower courts’ findings that tribal rights (established in an 1868 treaty with the United States …

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Every Law “Legislates Morality” — From Abortion to Minimum Wage

June 2, 2019

With the heating up of the abortion debate, the phrase “legislate morality” has come back into more frequent use. This week, the Washington Post printed a letter to the editor with the headline “Anti-abortion legislation is Prohibition all over again.” The author complains: “Prohibition was an attempt by government to legislate morality.” Similarly, state legislator …

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Why Single-Payer Healthcare Is So Bad

May 25, 2019

Compared to other types of universal healthcare systems, what we call “single-payer” healthcare is possibly the worst of all. Original Article: “Single-Payer Healthcare Is the Worst Kind of Universal Healthcare”.

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Mainstream Media’s War on Julian Assange

May 25, 2019

The Bill of Rights doesn’t mention that freedom of speech is restricted to a special class of establishment journalists. Freedom of speech is a universal property right, regardless of what the establishment-media gatekeepers say. Original Article: “Yes, Julian Assange Is a Journalist — But That Shouldn’t Matter”.

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Money Supply Growth Inches up From March’s 12-Year Low

May 23, 2019

Money supply growth inched up in April, rising slightly above the March growth level, which was at a 12-year (145-month) low. In April, year-over-year growth in the money supply was at 1.99 percent. That was up slightly from March’s growth rate of 1.92 percent, but was well down from April 2018’s rate of 4.32 percent. …

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Single-Payer Healthcare Is the Worst Kind of Universal Healthcare

May 18, 2019

In the United States, thanks largely to Bernie Sanders, the term “single-payer health care” has become more or less synonymous with the phrase “universal healthcare.” This stems partially from the fact that “single-payer” is the term most often used to refer to foreign systems of universal healthcare, and also because most Americans know virtually nothing …

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In the US, Rich States Spend Less on Welfare

May 15, 2019

As I’ve noted in the past , when it comes to government spending on social welfare programs, the United States is hardly the free-market, libertarian “paradise” many social democrats suppose it to be. When we look at social spending as a percentage of GDP, the US is similar to Switzerland, and the US spends more …

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Public Schools Aren’t Taking Security Seriously

May 9, 2019

Public high schools still aren’t taking school security seriously. Last month, hundreds of thousands of students in the Denver area stayed home from school when a woman in Florida suggested online that she was “obsessed” with the Columbine shootings. The woman, named Sol Pais, disappeared from her home near Miami in mid-April. Soon after, her …

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Why One Corporation

May 2, 2019

Scanning the headlines, one might notice that there is now a multitude of articles on the measles virus in most major media outlets. Outbreaks in places like New York City have led to what the AP calls “extraordinary police powers” to mandate vaccinations or quarantine those suspected of the disease.
Proponents of mandatory vaccines defend these measures while contended there is too much resistance to measles vaccination based on a variety of philosophical or religious concerns. They want new state laws eliminating the possibility of opting out of any vaccination for any non-medical reasons.
Why So Few Choices in Vaccines?
But why are some people resistant to the measles vaccine? And more importantly, are there any ways that

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American Interventionists Hurt the Cause of Freedom in Venezuela

May 2, 2019

The United States has a long, violent history of intervention in Latin America, although few Americans know about it. Were one to ask the average American, for example, about the US occupation of the Dominican Republic — which lasted for eight years from 1916 to 1924 — one is likely to only receive a blank …

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Why One Corporation Can Dictate Measles Policy in America

May 1, 2019

Scanning the headlines, one might notice that there is now a multitude of articles on the measles virus in most major media outlets. Outbreaks in places like New York City have led to what the AP calls “extraordinary police powers” to mandate vaccinations or quarantine those suspected of the disease. Proponents of mandatory vaccines defend …

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Countries with “Free Tuition” Often Have Fewer College Graduates

April 27, 2019

Presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren says she wants to make public colleges and universities tuition-free. That is, she wants free college for anyone willing to attend a public higher education institution. Presumably, an important goal of this policy change — other than getting Elizabeth Warren elected, of course — would be to increase the total number …

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The Problem with the Census

April 24, 2019

The Census Bureau has long known more about my family history than my family does. For instance, it was through old census forms that I discovered my grandmother changed her name from “Paula” to “Pauline” at some time after 1930. This was news even to her children. The 1930 census form also reported her place …

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Bernie Tells America: Pull Yourself up by Your Bootstraps!

April 19, 2019

On Monday, Bernie Sanders released ten years of tax returns, and it turns out he’s a millionaire. Thanks especially to revenues from book royalties, Sanders is now, as CNN put it, “in the category of the super-rich.” Or, as some might say, he’s part of “the 1%.” After years of denouncing “millionaires and billionaires” and …

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Yes, Julian Assange Is a Journalist — But That Shouldn’t Matter

April 19, 2019

Julian Assange was arrested last week in London, and he awaits legal proceedings designs to extradite him to the United States to be tried on hacking charges. At least, those are the charges currently known. Experience suggests that US authorities are likely to add additional charges once they have Assange in the US. The US …

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Can Modern Man Re-Create

April 18, 2019

The Notre Dame cathedral in Paris isn’t the first historically significant church to go up in smoke. The Basilica of Saint Paul’s Outside-the-Walls — after standing for more than 1,400 years — was almost totally destroyed by fire in 1823. It housed the tomb of the Apostle Paul, and was a major basilica, second only to St Peter’s as a pilgrimage site. Thanks to a construction worker, the church was accidently set on fire.
Its destruction was a great disaster at the time, and an international appeal went out for assistance in its reconstruction. The world responded and the church was rebuilt to the original design. Today, it is a beautiful church, and it remains the site of the Apostle’s tomb. It also still contains many works of

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Why Trump Wants the Fed To Pump Even More Easy Money

April 5, 2019

Donald Trump this morning condemned the Federal Reserve’s “unnecessary and destructive actions,” by which he presumably means the Fed’s recent attempts to tighten monetary policy. Since 2016 — after nearly a decade of ultra-accommodative monetary policy, the Fed began to ever-so-slightly scale back its easy-money policies, beginning with gradual increases in the federal funds rate. …

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Rent Control Is Terrible: So Keep it Local

April 4, 2019

In recent decades, a number of states enacted statewide law preempting local ordinances enacting rent control. Now, some state governments are beginning to move in the opposite direction. State-level policymakers are attempting to repeal these bans in some states with the hope that local governments will then enact rent-control measures of their own. Two recent …

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3 Reasons Why Facebook’s Zuckerberg Wants More Government Regulation

April 2, 2019

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg wants more government regulation of social media. In a March 30 op-ed for the Washington Post, Zuckerberg trots out the innocent-sounding pablum we’ve come to expect from him: I believe we need a more active role for governments and regulators. By updating the rules for the Internet, we can preserve what’s …

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Electoral College: Why We Must Decentralize Democracy

March 31, 2019

Although it was long assumed that the electoral college favored Democrats — and this assumption continued right up to election night 2016 — Democrats in the United States have now decided the electoral college is a bad thing. Thus, we continue to see legislative efforts to do away with the electoral college, accompanied by claims that it’s …

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