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“Nothing ever ends, Adrian.”

Summary:
Vox organized a symposium on the question “What do we do now that will be considered unthinkable in 50 years?” — not as an exercise in speculative fiction and futurology but a way of letting people make claims about being on the “wrong side of history.”When they asked me to take part, I said I really couldn’t, because I rejected the premise, and the only thing I could write would be a critique of the idea of history having, in that moralistic sense, sides. To my pleasant surprise, they asked me to write that, then. And I did. If you enjoyed 600 words about that, maybe you’ll enjoy 11,000. (I’m an academic, after all.) See: Contra Politanism, European Journal of Political Theory. Published on: April 3, 2019April 3, 2019Author: Jacob T. Levy

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Vox organized a symposium on the question “What do we do now that will be considered unthinkable in 50 years?” — not as an exercise in speculative fiction and futurology but a way of letting people make claims about being on the “wrong side of history.”

When they asked me to take part, I said I really couldn’t, because I rejected the premise, and the only thing I could write would be a critique of the idea of history having, in that moralistic sense, sides. To my pleasant surprise, they asked me to write that, then. And I did.

If you enjoyed 600 words about that, maybe you’ll enjoy 11,000. (I’m an academic, after all.) See: Contra Politanism, European Journal of Political Theory.

Jacob T. Levy
Jacob T. Levy is the Tomlinson Professor of Political Theory at McGill University. He writes on federalism, freedom of association, indigenous peoples, constitutional theory, and Enlightenment political thought.

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