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Quotation of the Day…

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… is from page 5 of Tyler Cowen’s excellent 2019 book Big Business: A Love Letter to an American Anti-Hero: Many features of contemporary America are wonderful, including high levels of trust in the corporate sector, but the weirdness in our government has been rising. In contrast, the world of American business has never been more productive, more tolerant, and more cooperative. It is not just a sources of GDP and prosperity; it is a ray of normalcy and predictability in its steady focus on producing what can be profitably sold to customers. Successful businesses grow dynamically, but they also try to create oases of stability and tolerance in which they can perfect their production methods. DBx: So true. And yet many on the political left are blind to this reality. These

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… is from page 5 of Tyler Cowen’s excellent 2019 book Big Business: A Love Letter to an American Anti-Hero:

Quotation of the Day…Many features of contemporary America are wonderful, including high levels of trust in the corporate sector, but the weirdness in our government has been rising.

In contrast, the world of American business has never been more productive, more tolerant, and more cooperative. It is not just a sources of GDP and prosperity; it is a ray of normalcy and predictability in its steady focus on producing what can be profitably sold to customers. Successful businesses grow dynamically, but they also try to create oases of stability and tolerance in which they can perfect their production methods.

DBx: So true. And yet many on the political left are blind to this reality. These “progressives” cling to the antediluvian contempt for commerce. Improving one’s life by building better mousetraps that are peacefully offered for sale – mousetraps that no one is forced to buy – seems way less cool and emotionally stimulating than using force to order other people about in the hope of producing some fancied social ‘outcomes.’

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Don Boudreaux
He is a professor of economics at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia. Previously, he was president of the Foundation for Economic Education.

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