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Quotation of the Day…

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… is from page 286 of Kristian Niemietz’s excellent 2019 book, Socialism: The Failed Idea That Never Dies: [O]ur economic intuitions are a legacy of the tribal age. Most anti-capitalist arguments, then, no matter how much complex-sounding sociological jargon they may use, are really just sophisticated rationalisations of primitive urges. DBx: ’tis true. While the motives of those who plead for improving the economy consciously through the use of coercion exercised by an authority are often laudable – and while they sometimes couch their arguments in mathematics downright rococo in their complexity – all of these people assume that the modern economy is simply a scaled up tribal economy. They do not understand that modernity differs from the tribe categorically. The complexity of the

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… is from page 286 of Kristian Niemietz’s excellent 2019 book, Socialism: The Failed Idea That Never Dies:

Quotation of the Day…[O]ur economic intuitions are a legacy of the tribal age. Most anti-capitalist arguments, then, no matter how much complex-sounding sociological jargon they may use, are really just sophisticated rationalisations of primitive urges.

DBx: ’tis true.

While the motives of those who plead for improving the economy consciously through the use of coercion exercised by an authority are often laudable – and while they sometimes couch their arguments in mathematics downright rococo in their complexity – all of these people assume that the modern economy is simply a scaled up tribal economy. They do not understand that modernity differs from the tribe categorically. The complexity of the modern economy is far too vast for primitive-brained humans – for that’s what we all are – to begin to comprehend and much less to consciously arrange to suit any of our fancies.

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Don Boudreaux
He is a professor of economics at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia. Previously, he was president of the Foundation for Economic Education.

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