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Private Entities Should be Free to Choose

Summary:
Here’s a letter to a new correspondent: Mr. W__: Thanks for your e-mail. I share your fear of vaccine passports, as well as your hope that businesses in jurisdictions without passport mandates will not require customers and employees to show such passports. I cannot, however, agree that businesses and other private organizations not be allowed to choose to require customers and employees to show such such passports. You’re correct that fear of Covid is far out of proportion to its true risks. You’re correct also that pundits and politicians will continue to stir up Covid hysteria such that many businesses will feel they have no choice but to require the presentation of vaccine passports. But such is the troubled world we live in. As a practical matter, if public attitudes are such as

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Here’s a letter to a new correspondent:

Mr. W__:

Thanks for your e-mail.

I share your fear of vaccine passports, as well as your hope that businesses in jurisdictions without passport mandates will not require customers and employees to show such passports. I cannot, however, agree that businesses and other private organizations not be allowed to choose to require customers and employees to show such such passports.

You’re correct that fear of Covid is far out of proportion to its true risks. You’re correct also that pundits and politicians will continue to stir up Covid hysteria such that many businesses will feel they have no choice but to require the presentation of vaccine passports. But such is the troubled world we live in. As a practical matter, if public attitudes are such as to demand the presentation of such passports, it’s futile to expect governments to prohibit businesses from requiring such presentation.

Gov. Ron DeSantis is able to impose – inappropriately, in my view – such a prohibition on businesses in that state precisely because Floridians’ fear of Covid and, hence, their demand for vaccine passports are sufficiently weak as to cause him no serious political trouble for this prohibition. Yet, ironically, this fact means that, absent this prohibition, while some businesses in Florida would require the presentation of passports, not all would. People would be free to choose.

While it’s always very dangerous to call upon the state to ramp up its restrictions on property, contract, and commerce rights, this danger is especially high in times such as these when the state is already abusing its powers unprecedentedly.

I would be justly accused of hypocrisy if, with one breath, I criticize – as I do – government for restricting businesses’, workers’, and consumers’ freedom to deal with each other as they choose according to their own preferences, whatever these might be, and then with the next breath call upon government to restrict businesses’, workers’, and consumers’ freedom to deal with each other according to their own preferences, whatever these might be.

That I intensely prefer my fellow citizens not to have a preference for patronizing businesses that require the presentation of vaccine passports doesn’t come close to being a sufficient condition for me to call upon the state to prevent businesses from catering to my fellow-citizens’ preferences. This conclusion is not changed one iota by the fact that this popular preference for the use of vaccine passports is one that I believe is both misguided and pumped-up by the absurd biases of the media and political elites.

Sincerely,
Donald J. Boudreaux
Professor of Economics
and
Martha and Nelson Getchell Chair for the Study of Free Market Capitalism at the Mercatus Center
George Mason University
Fairfax, VA 22030

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Don Boudreaux
He is a professor of economics at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia. Previously, he was president of the Foundation for Economic Education.

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