Tuesday , January 25 2022
Home / Don Boudreaux /Quotation of the Day…

Quotation of the Day…

Summary:
… is from page 389 of Michael Oakeshott’s 1948 essay “The Political Economy of Freedom” as this essay is reprinted the 1991 Liberty Fund collection of some of Oakeshott’s work, Rationalism in Politics and Other Essays: The history of institutions,’ says Acton, ‘is often a history of deception and illusions.’ Arrangements which in their beginnings promoted a dispersion of power often, in the course of time, themselves become over-mighty or even absolute while still claiming the recognition and loyalty which belonged to them in respect of their first character. To further liberty we need to be clear-sighted enough to recognise such a change, and energetic enough to set on foot the remedy while the evil is still small. And what more than anything else contributes to this

Topics:
Don Boudreaux considers the following as important:

This could be interesting, too:

Don Boudreaux writes Some Non-Covid Links

Don Boudreaux writes Some Covid Links

Don Boudreaux writes Quotation of the Day…

Don Boudreaux writes Let’s Separate School and State

… is from page 389 of Michael Oakeshott’s 1948 essay “The Political Economy of Freedom” as this essay is reprinted the 1991 Liberty Fund collection of some of Oakeshott’s work, Rationalism in Politics and Other Essays:

Quotation of the Day…The history of institutions,’ says Acton, ‘is often a history of deception and illusions.’ Arrangements which in their beginnings promoted a dispersion of power often, in the course of time, themselves become over-mighty or even absolute while still claiming the recognition and loyalty which belonged to them in respect of their first character. To further liberty we need to be clear-sighted enough to recognise such a change, and energetic enough to set on foot the remedy while the evil is still small. And what more than anything else contributes to this clear-sightedness is relief from the distraction of a rigid doctrine which fixes upon an institution a falsely permanent character, and then (when the illusion is at last recognised) calls for a revolution.

Don Boudreaux
He is a professor of economics at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia. Previously, he was president of the Foundation for Economic Education.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *