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Home / Carpe Diem / See an animation of how the solar eclipse will look from anywhere in the U.S. – Publications – AEI

See an animation of how the solar eclipse will look from anywhere in the U.S. – Publications – AEI

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AEI See an animation of how the solar eclipse will look from anywhere in the U.S. From Time.com, you can enter any US location by zip code and watch a time-series animation of the 2017 solar eclipse on Monday, August 21 based on your view from that exact location. For example, the graphic above shows what the eclipse will look like from Washington, D.C. at one minute past the 2:41 p.m. peak. Happy viewing next Monday, you’ll now know what to expect from your location! See an animation of how the solar eclipse will look from anywhere in the U.S. Mark Perry

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See an animation of how the solar eclipse will look from anywhere in the U.S.

See an animation of how the solar eclipse will look from anywhere in the U.S. - Publications – AEI

From Time.com, you can enter any US location by zip code and watch a time-series animation of the 2017 solar eclipse on Monday, August 21 based on your view from that exact location. For example, the graphic above shows what the eclipse will look like from Washington, D.C. at one minute past the 2:41 p.m. peak. Happy viewing next Monday, you’ll now know what to expect from your location!

See an animation of how the solar eclipse will look from anywhere in the U.S.
Mark Perry

Mark Perry

Mark J. Perry is concurrently a scholar at AEI and a professor of economics and finance at the University of Michigan’s Flint campus. He is best known as the creator and editor of the popular economics blog Carpe Diem. At AEI, Perry writes about economic and financial issues for American.com and the AEIdeas blog.

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