Wednesday , August 23 2017
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Thursday afternoon links – Publications – AEI

Summary:
AEI Thursday afternoon links 1. Chart of the Day I (above). Illustrates why Larry Summers had to resign as president of Harvard University when he dared to cite statistical evidence that the variability of male math aptitude has been proven to be greater than the variability of female math aptitude. So while men and women might have equal mathematical ability on average, there are disproportionately more men than women with very low or very high scores in the tails of the distribution. That is statistically verifiable and non-controversial, except among those who don’t understand distributions or who are blinded by gender/feminist activism. (HT/Warren Platts) ============================================ 2. Cartoon of the Day (above). ===============================================

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Thursday afternoon links

Thursday afternoon links - Publications – AEI

1. Chart of the Day I (above). Illustrates why Larry Summers had to resign as president of Harvard University when he dared to cite statistical evidence that the variability of male math aptitude has been proven to be greater than the variability of female math aptitude. So while men and women might have equal mathematical ability on average, there are disproportionately more men than women with very low or very high scores in the tails of the distribution. That is statistically verifiable and non-controversial, except among those who don’t understand distributions or who are blinded by gender/feminist activism. (HT/Warren Platts)

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Thursday afternoon links - Publications – AEI

2. Cartoon of the Day (above).

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3. Google’s Response Insults and Condescends to Women.  From a post on the Legal Insurrection blog “Google CEO Mansplains That He Eliminated Diverse Thought … To Protect Defenseless Women“:

In other words: how dare a non-leftist male offer an opinion of his own?  Google, it turns out, cannot tolerate random people expressing such thoughts . . . . because it’s bound to upset women. In this, Google insults women far more than anything in the now-fired employee’s missive ever could.

What women like me hear from Google:

Women are such precious, emotional, delicate creatures, damsels in distress really, that we wilt and swoon in the face of any commentary that suggests we are not capable in the tech world. The big, benevolent Google has cast itself as our hero, defending inherently weak women and firing some man no one has ever heard of because he expressed . . . thoughts!

Thursday afternoon links - Publications – AEI

4. Chart of the Day II (above) from Michael Shermer on Twitter, who asks:

Companies hiring from bottom 4 fields (e.g., Silicon Valley) beware of bias police. What about companies hiring from top 4? Are they biased?

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5. Federal Level Program Count: Female-Only 100+, Male-Only 0. From CulturalMisandry.com:

Feminists often complain about how we live in a “patriarchy,” and how women are “oppressed” and men are privileged. Remember that when reading over this list below [of federal programs dedicated to women-only] and try to think of a single group in history that called themselves oppressed, but had so much dedicated to them. In contrast, there is not a single Federal level program dedicated to men or even boys in the US. Also note that almost every one of these female-only programs are in areas where women are doing far better than men and boys (education, health care, homicide, homelessness, workplace deaths, violence, etc.).

The list of more than 100 federal programs dedicated to women-only includes these program counts by federal agency:

Department of Health and Humans Services (18), Centers for Disease Control (9), National Institutes of Health (9), FDA (3), Department of Defense (5), Veteran’s Administration (6), Department of Education (8), NASA (7), Department of Energy (7), Department of Labor (10), SBA (3), HUD (4), USDA (2) and Department of Justice (23).

Thursday afternoon links - Publications – AEI

6. Chart of the Day II (above) — The Honeybees Are Back. From Bloomberg:

The number of U.S. honeybees, a critical component to agricultural production, rose in 2017 from a year earlier, and deaths of the insects attributed to a mysterious malady that’s affected hives in North America and Europe declined, according to a new U.S. Department of Agriculture honeybee health survey.

The reason for the bee comeback? Sean Reagan explains in the August/September issue of ReasonHow Capitalism Saved the Bees“:

Despite the increased mortality rates for bees, there has been no downward trend in the total number of honeybee colonies in the US over the past ten years. Indeed, there are more honeybee colonies in the country today than when the collapse disorder began.

Beekeepers have proven incredibly adept at responding to this challenge. Thanks to a robust market for pollination services, they have addressed the increasing mortality rates by rapidly rebuilding their hives, with virtually no economic effects passed on to consumers. It’s a remarkable story of adaptation and resilience, and the media has almost entirely ignored it.

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7. These Sugar Barons Built an $8 Billion Fortune With Washington’s Help is the title of a Bloomberg report about the Fanjul family in Florida, who has become wealthy a large multi-billion dollar fortune thanks to US sugar policies. That level of legal plunder and crony crapitalism demonstrate why trade protectionism and rent-seeking are so dangerous, costly and damaging to the economy, and why that type of evil behavior should be resisted, vilified and stopped. (HT/Warren Smith)

See recent CD post on rent-seeking here. As Gordon Tullock pointed out (quoted in the rent-seeking post):

As a successful theft will stimulate other thieves to greater industry and require great investment in protective measures, so each successful establishment of a monopoly or creation of a tariff will stimulate greater diversion of resources to attempts to organize further transfers of income.

It’s a great and overlooked point: If the Fanjul family can become multi-billionaires through rent-seeking that results in anti-consumer trade protectionism for the sugar industry, that successful legal plunder of consumers and taxpayers will inspire other potential protectionists to engage in rent-seeking for their industries and companies. That is, successful taxpayer/consumer pickpockets encourage more of that wasteful, immoral and shameful activity.


8. Video of the Day I (above) — Robot Draws Blood Faster and More Safely Than Humans.

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9. Video of the Day II (above) — How Airlines Schedule Flights. Fascinating. 

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10. Video of the Day III (below)Venezuela’s Activist Journalists. In Venezuela, members of the media face censorship and threats. The Venezuelan government has recently cracked down on independent newspapers and radio networks in an effort to silence any voices critical of the ruling left-wing party. In the lead-up to last year’s elections, VICE News was on the ground in Venezuela with the activist journalists who are fighting against the censorship of the country’s dwindling free press.

 

Thursday afternoon links
Mark Perry

Mark Perry
Mark J. Perry is concurrently a scholar at AEI and a professor of economics and finance at the University of Michigan’s Flint campus. He is best known as the creator and editor of the popular economics blog Carpe Diem. At AEI, Perry writes about economic and financial issues for American.com and the AEIdeas blog.

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