Thursday , November 22 2018
Home / Carpe Diem / Protectionism and trade barriers aren’t just bad economics — they’re also immoral – Publications – AEI

Protectionism and trade barriers aren’t just bad economics — they’re also immoral – Publications – AEI

Summary:
AEI Protectionism and trade barriers aren’t just bad economics — they’re also immoral That’s what we learn from Cato’s Dan Ikenson’s May 2018 article in City A.M. and the Cato website: There is near consensus among economists that free trade generates more wealth than any system that restricts cross-border exchange. Even more compelling is the morality of free trade: free people should be entitled to the fruits of their labor, and those fruits include the right to exchange with whomever and on whatever terms they choose. To oppose free trade is to favor not only sub-optimal economic outcomes, but coercive, aggressive, and immoral actions by governments. …. Trade barriers at home raise the costs and reduce the amount of imports that can be purchased. Free trade reduces those costs and

Topics:
Mark Perry considers the following as important: , ,

This could be interesting, too:

Mark Perry writes Who’d a-thunk it? Government-run public projects fail to operate efficiently and deliver quality service? – Publications – AEI

Don Boudreaux writes No Subsidies Needed

Don Boudreaux writes Quotation of the Day…

Don Boudreaux writes Bonus Quotation of the Day…

AEI
Protectionism and trade barriers aren’t just bad economics — they’re also immoral

That’s what we learn from Cato’s Dan Ikenson’s May 2018 article in City A.M. and the Cato website:

There is near consensus among economists that free trade generates more wealth than any system that restricts cross-border exchange. Even more compelling is the morality of free trade: free people should be entitled to the fruits of their labor, and those fruits include the right to exchange with whomever and on whatever terms they choose.

To oppose free trade is to favor not only sub-optimal economic outcomes, but coercive, aggressive, and immoral actions by governments.

….

Trade barriers at home raise the costs and reduce the amount of imports that can be purchased. Free trade reduces those costs and increases purchasing power at home.

Protectionism benefits producers over consumers, favors big business over small, hurts lower-income more than higher-income consumers. Trade barriers — the handmaiden of protectionism — are simply taxes on consumers and businesses that impede the global division of labor and the creation of wealth.

Protectionism and trade barriers aren’t just bad economics — they’re also immoral
Mark Perry

Mark Perry
Mark J. Perry is concurrently a scholar at AEI and a professor of economics and finance at the University of Michigan’s Flint campus. He is best known as the creator and editor of the popular economics blog Carpe Diem. At AEI, Perry writes about economic and financial issues for American.com and the AEIdeas blog.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *