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Bonus quotation of the day on how Asians disrupt and undermine the narrative of white privilege…. – Publications – AEI

Summary:
AEI Bonus quotation of the day on how Asians disrupt and undermine the narrative of white privilege…. …. is from Vincent Harinam and Rob Henderson’s article in Quillette “Why White Privilege Is Wrong—Part 1“: What gives white privilege a patina of empirical credibility are its statistical comparisons between blacks and whites. However, these statistics are often decontextualized, omitting base rates and key group comparators. As Thomas Sowell points out, “The mere omission of one crucial fact can turn accurate statistics into traps that lead to conclusions that would be demonstrably false if the full facts were known.” Take mortgage approval rates, for example. In 2000, data from the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights showed that 44.6 percent of black applicants were turned down for mortgage

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Bonus quotation of the day on how Asians disrupt and undermine the narrative of white privilege….

…. is from Vincent Harinam and Rob Henderson’s article in QuilletteWhy White Privilege Is Wrong—Part 1“:

What gives white privilege a patina of empirical credibility are its statistical comparisons between blacks and whites. However, these statistics are often decontextualized, omitting base rates and key group comparators. As Thomas Sowell points out, “The mere omission of one crucial fact can turn accurate statistics into traps that lead to conclusions that would be demonstrably false if the full facts were known.” Take mortgage approval rates, for example.

In 2000, data from the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights showed that 44.6 percent of black applicants were turned down for mortgage loans. In comparison, 22.3 percent of white applicants were turned down. In spite of data indicating that black-owned banks had turned down black applicants at rates higher than white-owned banks, accusations of discrimination within the banking sector were widespread. However, the same report from the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights revealed another interesting statistic: the mortgage rejection rate for Asian Americans was 12.4 percent. In other words, Asian Americans were approved at a higher rate than whites. This data point never saw the light of day in most newspapers or television news programs.

Seldom are Asian American data included in news stories or academic studies which conclude that racial discrimination explains much or most of the disparities between blacks and whites. Reporting this data would undermine, if not devastate, the conclusions made by the proponents of white privilege. This, according to journalist Wesley Yang, is why they are often excluded. Asians disrupt the narrative of white privilege.

Related: A few other examples below graphically of how Asians disrupt the narrative of white privilege.

Bonus quotation of the day on how Asians disrupt and undermine the narrative of white privilege…. - Publications – AEI Bonus quotation of the day on how Asians disrupt and undermine the narrative of white privilege…. - Publications – AEI Bonus quotation of the day on how Asians disrupt and undermine the narrative of white privilege…. - Publications – AEI

Bonus quotation of the day on how Asians disrupt and undermine the narrative of white privilege….
Mark Perry

Mark Perry
Mark J. Perry is concurrently a scholar at AEI and a professor of economics and finance at the University of Michigan’s Flint campus. He is best known as the creator and editor of the popular economics blog Carpe Diem. At AEI, Perry writes about economic and financial issues for American.com and the AEIdeas blog.

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