Friday , October 18 2019
Home / Bleeding Hearths Libertarians

Bleeding Hearths Libertarians

How Government Regulations Are Harming Entrepreneurs

Editor’s Note. The following is a guest post written by Anastasia Boden. Anastasia is an attorney at the Pacific Legal Foundation’s Economic Liberty Project, where she challenges anti-competitive licensing laws and laws that restrict freedom of speech. The Pacific Legal Foundation fights against overbearing government bureaucracies and burdensome economic regulations that hold back entrepreneurs and business owners. To learn more about Pacific Legal Foundation’s work, visit:...

Read More »

The Pursuit: Arthur Brooks on Capitalism, Dignity, and Opportunity for All

I recently had an opportunity to watch The Pursuit, a relatively new documentary film featuring Arthur Brooks, former president of the American Enterprise Institute and author of The Conservative Heart and Love Your Enemies, among other books. It’s a pretty terrific film, directed by John Papola (of Keynes vs. Hayek “Fear the Boom and Bust” fame). In it, we follow Arthur Brooks as he travels to India, Barcelona, Mumbai, Kentucky, and other destinations to talk with people about...

Read More »

Should Philosophers Try to Cite More Minorities?

Here’s what seems like innocuous and even noble advice for authors and referees: Try to ensure that papers cite members of under-represented groups.I’m not so sure. I’m concerned that this proposal, rather than helping to fix the problem, doesn’t understand the problem or take the problem seriously.Some background: In most academic fields, the practice is that you cite pretty much everything relevant to your work. In philosophy, people tend to cite themselves, their friends, John...

Read More »

Cracks in Georgetown MSB’s Ivory Tower

Georgetown’s MSB teaches principles of good management but is not particularly interested in following them. A good illustration is in how we allocate merit raises. (N.B., I get very high merit scores and so currently benefit from the system we have. Nevertheless, it’s a bad system.) Each year, everyone gets a score for Research, Teaching, and Service. These are worth different percentages depending on rank. One’s raise depends on the weighted-average score. 1. The system is...

Read More »

Simone Sepe on *When All Else Fails*

Law professor Simone Sepe reviews When All Else Fails at NDPR. The review is thorough, but unfortunately for Sepe and fortunately for me, the main “critique” of the book misses the mark rather widely. The way it does so is of broader interest, I think, because it illustrates some common failings in statist-authoritarian philosophy. Sepe says: The basic difficulty with Brennan’s discussion, however, lies in his defense of the moral parity thesis (and correspondingly his criticism...

Read More »

Convivencia, In My Dreams It Always Seems

Andalusiawith fields full of grainI have to see youagain and again A Muslim and a Christian playing dueling banjos (13th century). Mediæval Andalusia, or al-Andalus, was the region of Iberia under Muslim rule, its constantly shifting boundaries comprising, at their greatest extent, the entire territory of modern Spain and Portugal (plus a bit more), and at their smallest extent, just the area around Granada. (So, not quite the same territory as “Andalusia” today.) This period, known...

Read More »

Molinari Review I.1 Now Free Online, Molinari Review I.2 Heading to Print

In celebration of the 17th anniversary of the Molinari Institute, we’re happy to announce: a) The long-awaited second issue of the Molinari Review will be published later this month. More details soon! b) In the meantime, the entire first issue is now available for free online on the journal’s archive page. You can download either individual articles or the whole thing. Contents include: “The Right to Privacy Is Tocquevillean, Not Lockean: Why It Matters” by Julio Rodman...

Read More »

Do We Need Government? No, But You Need This Anthology

A long-awaited anthology I’m scheduled to appear in (with a couple of pieces on the question “Do We Need Government?”) has now, I hear, been split into two – one volume on metaphysics and epistemology, and the other on ethics, æsthetics, and politics – and in that form (and with a bunch of historical selections deleted) is/are finally slouching toward publication; see the tables of contents here and here. Some old friends are in it/them too, as you’ll see (if you know who my old...

Read More »

On liberalism and democracy

I have a new podcast discussion with our friends at the Institute for Liberal Studies here. The new ILS podcast, “The curious task”, is hosted by Alex Aragona and its overall site is here; previous guests include Nigel Ashford and Peter Jaworski. Published on: August 21, 2019August 21, 2019Author: Jacob T. Levy

Read More »

On the Latest Brouhaha in Academic Philosophy

Daily Nous posted this badly written letter yesterday: http://dailynous.com/2019/08/06/recognizing-gender-critical-feminism-anti-trans-activism-guest-post/ It claims that Gender Critical Feminists aren’t engaging in scholarship when they…get this…publish papers or conduct interviews where they argue for GCF. Rather, they are really doing activism (which, presumably, means they are less protected by norms of academic freedom). But the authors don’t argue for this position, really....

Read More »