Friday , August 17 2018
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The author Peter Boettke
Peter Boettke
Peter Joseph Boettke (January 3, 1960) is an American economist of the Austrian School. He is currently a University Professor of Economics and Philosophy at George Mason University; the BB&T Professor for the Study of Capitalism, Vice President for Research, and Director of the F.A. Hayek Program for Advanced Study in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics at the Mercatus Center at GMU.

Coordination Problem

Chapter Abstracts from book on Hayek

Word from Palgrave/Macmillan is that my book, F. A. Hayek: Economics, Political Economy, and Social Philosophy will be published next week. In the process of preparing the book for final publication I was asked to provide chapter abstracts. Here they are: Chapter 1 Friedrich Hayek’s ideas played a fundamental role in all major debates over economic policy-making throughout his lifetime and beyond. They were developed in a precise historical context and were the...

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The Hayek Interviews as a Great Resource

The oral history project at UCLA is a treasure trove for Hayek scholars.  As I was working through my book, I spent a tremendous amount of time watching, listening and reading material from this source.  You can find the material all collected at UFM, but also on You Tube and at UCLA you can find the entire transcript of the conversations.  Hayek's memory is not 100% accurate, but his insights I would argue come shining through.  The strongest interviews are with Alchian, Buchanan...

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Constitutional Principles, Political Economy, and The Teaching of Economics

Watch this conversation between Walter Williams and James Buchanan.  A couple things to note.  For Buchanan and Williams the critical issue is constitutional restraints.  Note the point raised about interpret group politics and winning coalitions, this is the point developed in Politics by Principle, Not Interest. And, note how Buchanan views the problems with the Warren Courts are associated with the erosion of constitutional restraints, not in...

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Special issue of Real-World Economic Review on The Public Economy and a New Public Economics

The relationship between the economy and the state is as old as the discipline of economics itself.  In the recent issue of Real-World Economic Review, this topic is explored by an array of authors that seek to challenge various aspects of what they consider the classical position.  There really isn't any new faces in this crowd, so anyone who has read in this topic for awhile will know the names and pretty much could guess the positions expressed, but it is convenient to have them...

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HES2018 in Chicago is in the books, sign up for HES2019 in NYC

The annual History of Economics Society meetings concluded this past Sunday (6/17/18) with a wide ranging talk by HES President Evelyn Forget (University of Manitoba).  Her talk was on the relationship between economists and the public, and in particular how economic ideas impact the beliefs and attitudes and everyday people. Her talk was entitled "Folk Wisdom in Economics." She is a health economists by training in addition to a historian of ideas, and she has carved out a niche on...

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Buchanan Camp — Park City, Utah

I have been spending the past few days at Buchanan Camp organized by Michael Munger and Johnny Anomaly, and I am thrilled to do so.  There are 12 other participants from the fields of philosophy, politics, and economics, and the conversation has been fascinatingly productive as far as I am concerned.  Keep in mind, I teach a course on Constitutional Political Economy to PhD students every Spring so the readings aren't new to me, but in a fundamental sense they are because the...

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EconTalk with Glen Weyl

Eric Posner and Glen Weyl have published a book that is deservedly attracting a lot of attention.  It will pay the readers of Coordination Problem great intellectual returns to invest significant time in studying this book very carefully.  Make no mistake, this is a book about designing markets, and using market-like institutions to realize normative aspirations in politics and society.  It is ambitious and bold, and I think it should excite the imagination and motivate careful...

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From Hayek to Lavoie and the Quest for a Political Philosophy for the Market Process

In the Hayek archives at Stanford sits a letter from Don Lavoie addressed to Hayek that thanks him for awarding Don the "Hayek Prize" for his devastating critique of socialism.  Don, in his office, back at GMU had a copy displayed of the original letter from Hayek.  This was during the mid-1980s, communism had not yet collapsed, but it was teetering, and reform movements were underway in Poland and Hungary, and of course, the Soviet Union itself was about to embark on both...

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EconTalk Podcast on “Economics and Public Administration” and More

Last November I gave the Presidential address to the Southern Economic Association annual meetings in Tampa, Florida.  The theme of my talk was "Economics and Public Administration" and in some sense one important take away from my talk is that the realm of public administration begins where the possibility of economic calculation ends. This isn't a theme new to me, it was actually stated explicitly by Ludwig von Mises, and implicitly recognized by Richard Musgrave and inspired the...

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