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The author Peter Boettke
Peter Boettke
Peter Joseph Boettke (January 3, 1960) is an American economist of the Austrian School. He is currently a University Professor of Economics and Philosophy at George Mason University; the BB&T Professor for the Study of Capitalism, Vice President for Research, and Director of the F.A. Hayek Program for Advanced Study in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics at the Mercatus Center at GMU.

Coordination Problem

Buchanan Camp — Park City, Utah

I have been spending the past few days at Buchanan Camp organized by Michael Munger and Johnny Anomaly, and I am thrilled to do so.  There are 12 other participants from the fields of philosophy, politics, and economics, and the conversation has been fascinatingly productive as far as I am concerned.  Keep in mind, I teach a course on Constitutional Political Economy to PhD students every Spring so the readings aren't new to me, but in a fundamental sense they are because the...

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EconTalk with Glen Weyl

Eric Posner and Glen Weyl have published a book that is deservedly attracting a lot of attention.  It will pay the readers of Coordination Problem great intellectual returns to invest significant time in studying this book very carefully.  Make no mistake, this is a book about designing markets, and using market-like institutions to realize normative aspirations in politics and society.  It is ambitious and bold, and I think it should excite the imagination and motivate careful...

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From Hayek to Lavoie and the Quest for a Political Philosophy for the Market Process

In the Hayek archives at Stanford sits a letter from Don Lavoie addressed to Hayek that thanks him for awarding Don the "Hayek Prize" for his devastating critique of socialism.  Don, in his office, back at GMU had a copy displayed of the original letter from Hayek.  This was during the mid-1980s, communism had not yet collapsed, but it was teetering, and reform movements were underway in Poland and Hungary, and of course, the Soviet Union itself was about to embark on both...

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EconTalk Podcast on “Economics and Public Administration” and More

Last November I gave the Presidential address to the Southern Economic Association annual meetings in Tampa, Florida.  The theme of my talk was "Economics and Public Administration" and in some sense one important take away from my talk is that the realm of public administration begins where the possibility of economic calculation ends. This isn't a theme new to me, it was actually stated explicitly by Ludwig von Mises, and implicitly recognized by Richard Musgrave and inspired the...

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Leland Yeager and Austrian Macroeconomics

As most CP readers probably know, Leland Yeager passed away at age 93 on April 23rd. Many prominent economists with connections to Austrian economics have written very laudatory obituaries of a man who I think was the most underappreciated monetary theorist of the 20th century. I’d like to say some words about Yeager’s contributions as well, focusing on the way in which his work is central to a broader Austrian-oriented macroeconomics. This post will be personal, in the sense that...

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Bruce Caldwell talk at Ohio University on F. A. Hayek: Life and Legacy (March 2017)

Bruce Caldwell has spent the better part of 30 years studying as a historian of ideas the thought of F. A. Hayek, and more broadly the arc of his career as a way to understand the history of 20th century economic thought.  I just sent in my own book -- F. A. Hayek: Economics, Political Economy, and Social Philosophy -- to the publishers.  In the process of researching and writing up this book, I worked with my wonderful graduate students to start...

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Interactive Teaching as Research Productive Teaching

This video clip is from the Special Collections Oral History of GMU.  It discusses Buchanan's approach to teaching, and his shift of focus from his journeyman years of teaching at Tenn and Florida State to his graduate course in Public Finance and Welfare Economics at UVA and his effort to involve the students in his research process.  Also note his discussion of the difference between Jacob Viner and T. W. Schultz in their approach to teaching.  Buchanan embraces the Schultz...

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Reconnecting Economics with Moral Sciences

INET and Michael Sandel will be starting a new video series on what money can and cannot buy, and in the process reconnect economics with moral philosophy.  There is much to learn from his musings. But I believe he also has some serious blind spots.  Since I began my career focused on the history of ideas on socialism, and history of practice of socialism, these issues of what was science, and what was normative theorizing was critical to my enterprise....

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