Wednesday , May 22 2019
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The author Peter Boettke
Peter Boettke
Peter Joseph Boettke (January 3, 1960) is an American economist of the Austrian School. He is currently a University Professor of Economics and Philosophy at George Mason University; the BB&T Professor for the Study of Capitalism, Vice President for Research, and Director of the F.A. Hayek Program for Advanced Study in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics at the Mercatus Center at GMU.

Coordination Problem

McCloskey and Horwitz on Women, Markets, and Liberty

Well, mostly McCloskey. This is the full recording of the inaugural Madam C. J. Walker Colloquium in Political Economy at Ball State University, sponsored by the BSU Institute for Entrepreneurship and Free Enterprise. Deirdre and I wandered over a lot of territory in the nominal topic of "Women, Markets, and Liberty" in the first hour, and we got some excellent questions from the attendees. I hope you enjoy it as much as we did. 

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Art Carden reviews F. A. Hayek: Economics, Political Economy, and Social Philosophy (Palgrave/Macmillan, 2019)

Art Carden reviews my book on Hayek and the title of his review essay is "Read Hayek As If Your Children's Lives Depend On It."  I greatly appreciate Art's kind words and fully endorse the urgency of the task of reading and fully comprehending what Hayek is arguing in his various works, including The Road to Serfdom.  That book read rightly, not in the cartoon caricature of it depicted by its detractors, is extremely relevant for our times.  In fact, it presents a timeless message...

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Myth Busting and Economic Theory

I started reading John Quiggin’s Economics in Two Lessons, and its basically a critique of the proposition that market prices fully reflect opportunity costs. So the second lesson for Quiggin, as it was for Samuelson, teaches about externalities, monopoly power, business cycles, etc. in short, market failure theory. But much of the great advances in economic science during the 1960s-1990s was blowing up the mythology of market failure and the idea of government...

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Happy Birthday Professor Hayek

F. A. Hayek was born on May 8th 1899 in Vienna.  His intellectual achievements are well documented and well-known, culminating in his being awarded the Nobel Prize in Economic Science in 1974.  The question that we must grapple with today is the evolutionary potential of his ideas for research in economics, political economy and social philosophy for our age.  On his birthday, look through the Living Bibliography to get a glimpse of the explosion of work done on Hayek's ideas over...

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F. A. Hayek: Economics, Political Economy and Social Philosophy — the podcasts

My book on Hayek was published last September.  Since that time I have presented the book at several colleges and universities, and did multiple podcasts. I am going to provide links to those here so readers can track them down easily.  I still would love to do one with Russ Roberts at EconTalk, as I think we could have a great conversation on Hayek.  That is a hint for those who know Russ to write to him :) My new book (with Paul Aligica and Vlad Tarko) titled Public...

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Creativity and Combinatorial Thinking in Arts, Science and Commerce

In most narratives of my background, sports play a prominient role -- both the playing and the coaching -- and indeed they have.  Baseball was my first love, I was good at football, LOVED basketball, and enjoyed greatly competing in tennis (both individually in tournaments and with my college team).  Sports have shaped much of my thinking about everything. But between the ages of 12-15, I was also obsessed with music -- percussion to be exact.  My Aunt Lol married late in life...

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Hayek and His Ideas

Hayek is in the news again due to the auctioning of some of his personal items, including his Nobel Prize medal but also his edition of The Wealth of Nations. The results from the auction were quite impressive.  It is in my self-interest to point out that last fall I published a book on Hayekian ideas in the Great Thinkers in Economics series with Palgrave/Macmillan. But, today I want to provide links to the videos produced by Fraser Institute and the book by Don Boudreaux...

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An Introduction to the Work of the Ostroms

When I took my current gig as libertarianism.org's economics editor, one of the first pieces I wanted to commission was one explaining the contributions of the Ostroms and why they matter for modern libertarianism. So many of us academic types, especially those of us here at Coordination Problem and associated with the George Mason program more generally, talk about them, but I wondered whether outside of our circles, the reasons were understood by non-academic libertarians. ...

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What is Needed Now — A Civil, Subtle and Nuanced Discussion of Minimum Wage That is Evidence Based By Guided By Price Theory

Russ Roberts has a highly recommended discussion with Jacob Vigdor on the Seattle Minimum Wage and its consequences.  I am always amazed at how Russ consistently raises the level of discourse through EconTalk. Of course, to folks familiar with the nuances of price theory the multiple margins of adjustment has been a theme for decades.  See this earlier discussion by Walter Wessels, or Douglas Glen Whitmann. And, of course, Deirdre McCloskey argues this in her classic Price...

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