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The author Peter Boettke
Peter Boettke
Peter Joseph Boettke (January 3, 1960) is an American economist of the Austrian School. He is currently a University Professor of Economics and Philosophy at George Mason University; the BB&T Professor for the Study of Capitalism, Vice President for Research, and Director of the F.A. Hayek Program for Advanced Study in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics at the Mercatus Center at GMU.

Coordination Problem

Visions of the Future of Capitalism

Earlier this year I published my book, The Struggle for a Better World which consists of various published versions of public lectures I have given over roughly between 2000-2020 mainly at learned societies and associations.  They have also reflect a little bit of my globetrotting during that period as the site of lectures have ranged from New Zealand to East and Central Europe. These various lectures represent my attempt to come to grips not only with the trials and tribulations of...

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5 Tool “Players” and the Future is in the Creativity and Energy of the Next Generation of Scholars

I recently did this podcast with the Austrian Economics Institut in Vienna.  I would like to draw attention to my discussion of the pivotal role that a 5 tool player (in this instance I highlight Ben Powell, see min 55) and to my appeal to the creative and curious among the younger generation to accept the invitation to inquiry that is is Austrian economics and developed along their own lines (see min 59:30). I hope you find the discussion worth...

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Peter Boettke: «Austrian Economics in the Real World»

"Main line economics is a set of propositions, whereas main stream is a sociological characterization of what's currently fashionable within the economics profession. I want us to be more concerned not with fashion, but with the core propositions of what the science of economics teaches us." - Peter Boettke Peter Boettke (GMU) was interviewed about Austrian economics by Simon Sarevski (AEC). He explained his distinction between main stream and main line economics. He mentioned...

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After, After War

As US military planes left the airport in Afghanistan, the longest war in US history came to an end.  Now begins the hard recognition of the true costs of the last 20 years. Sadness of this episode in US history was accented last Sunday as the remains of 13 soldiers returned to Dover Air Force base in Delaware.  The Costs of War Project at Brown has been detailing as best they can the true costs of these efforts post-9/11.  As they summarize in their report: <> Over...

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The Struggle for a Better World | Prof. Peter Boettke

Professor Peter Boettke discusses liberalism, the social sciences, and other topics from his recent book, "The Struggle for a Better World." He describes liberalism as an emancipation project. From the publisher: In "The Struggle for a Better World," Peter J. Boettke explores how the social sciences, and political economy in particular, help us understand society and its institutions of governance. Boettke advances an approach for understanding, articulating, and...

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“What a science does, or should do, is simply to allow the average man, through professional specialization, to command the heights of genius.” James M. Buchanan

This description of the power of economics by Buchanan has always struck me as insightful.  Economics is a tool for the curious.  Properly understood, economics is not a tool for the power seeking and those who want to govern over others, though that is what the transformation of "economic science" turned the discipline into with a false view of science and an inappropriate understanding of democratic governance in the unholy alliance of statism and scientism that was the...

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“At the end of the day I think I am a teacher” — Steve Horwitz (1964-2021)

My dear friend, co-author, partner in so many educational and scholarly efforts since the mid 1980s passed away early Sunday morning (June 27, 2021) after a long and courageous battle with an aggressive form of cancer that to be honest with you I never heard of before he told me he was diagnosed with multiple myeloma.  Steve was an optimist to the end, and he fought his disease with courage and curiosity (yes, he was fascinated by the science) that was awe-inspiring.  Obviously my...

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The Market as a Social Space, and What Happens When The Firms that Occupy That Space Disappear Due to Economic Disruption

Virgil Storr is one of the most perceptive and intellectually challenging social scientists I know.  He also writes with grace and eloquence, but leave that aside at the moment.  He has pushed an argument for many years now that not only is the atomistic model of competition wrong headed, the more general "model" of cooperation in anonymity is mistaken.  Markets are spaces in which relationships are formed and sustained.  His argument makes one think, his argument makes one take...

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