Thursday , December 12 2019
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New Research on Development Subsidies, Labor Force Attachment, Occupational Licensing, and Regulatory Analysis

The Economics of a Targeted Economic Development Subsidy Matthew Mitchell, Michael Farren, Olivia Gonzalez, and Jeremy Horpedahl | Research Paper In an effort to spur economic growth and to burnish their job-creation bona fides, policymakers at the federal, state, and local levels often dispense targeted economic development subsidies. These selective incentives include targeted tax relief, targeted regulatory relief, cash subsidies, and in-kind donations of land and other valuable goods and...

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Reforming Additionality at the Export-Import Bank

Members of the advisory board, members of the board of directors, thank you for having me today. My name is Veronique de Rugy. I am a senior research fellow at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University, where I have been studying the Export-Import (Ex-Im) Bank for many years. During her confirmation hearing to become the new president of the Ex-Im Bank, Kimberly Reed made commitments to Senator Patrick Toomey in six areas, including improving protection for domestic companies from...

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Carola Binder on Political Pressure and the Twin Deficits of Central Banking

Carola Binder is an assistant professor of economics at Haverford College and is an associate editor of the Journal of Money, Credit, and Central Banking. Carola is also a member of the CEPR Research and Policy Network on Central Bank Communication, and joins the show today to discuss her work on central banking and populism. David and Carola also discuss the link between central bank credibility and popularity, the twin deficits of central banking, and why NGDP targeting could be an easy...

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The ACA's Medicaid Expansion

Before passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), Medicaid covered individuals with disabilities, lower-income seniors, pregnant women, and lower-income children along with their adult caretakers. The ACA opened program eligibility to working-age, able-bodied adults with incomes up to 138 percent of the federal poverty level. It also set much higher federal reimbursement rates for state expenditures on the new enrollees so that the federal govern­ment covers nearly the entire cost. In their...

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The Clinton-Bush-Obama-Trump Innovation Vision

Political partisans are quick to judge each other, regardless of the policy issue. Republicans and Democrats often turn every policy discussion into an “us vs. them” story and imply that the other side has it entirely wrong.  On some important issues, however, there exists more common ground and shared values than some care to admit. Believe it or not, innovation policy is one of those areas.  In fact, despite some differences from one administration to the next, America has had a fairly...

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Policy Disincentives in Maintaining Labor Force Attachment

Mr. Chairman and members of the committee, thank you for inviting me to testify today. I am a senior research fellow at the Mercatus Center at George Mason, where I study the US economy, the federal budget, and tax policy. Polices that ensure American workers can stay attached to the labor market are worth pursuing. Unfortunately, government policies at the federal, state, and local levels today make it harder for some workers to tap into particular markets in which workers are paid higher...

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Wisconsin Occupational Licensing: Barriers to Opportunity and Prospects for Reform

Chair Kapenga, Vice Chair Craig, and distinguished members of the committee: My name is Matthew Mitchell. I am an economist and a senior research fellow at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University, where I direct the Equity Initiative. Mercatus scholars working on the Equity Initiative study public policies that favor particular firms, industries, or occupations. In recent years, my colleagues and I have been studying occupational licensing laws, and I am grateful for the opportunity to...

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The DOE Should Clarify Model Uncertainty and Strengthen Cost and Benefit Comparisons in Its Analyses

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine have organized a committee to peer-review the analytical methods used by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in setting “standards regulations” for the performance of buildings and associated equipment and products. This short comment makes recommendations to the committee about ways in which DOE technical support documents (TSDs) can be improved. By way of background, I am a senior research fellow at the Mercatus Center at George...

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New Research on Quantifying Regulation, Insider Trading Reform, and Regulatory Accumulation

Quantifying Regulation in US States James Broughel, Patrick McLaughlin, Michael Kotrous | Data Visualization To gain a better understanding of the reach of state-level regulation in the United States, the Mercatus Center at George Mason University launched the State RegData project and has gathered and analyzed the regulations of 46 states plus the District of Columbia. (Unfortunately, the regulatory codes of Arkansas, Hawaii, New Jersey, and Vermont were not able to be analyzed owing to data...

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What Is Still Wrong with the Austrian School of Economics?

There are more scholars teaching and actively engaged in research associated with the Austrian School of Economics now than at any other time in its history. However, there is still something seriously wrong within the Austrian School and changes must be made both individually and collectively. In this piece, the author first discusses scientific progress with an emphasis on the individual behavior that is required to contribute to science, and the horizontal relationships that are required...

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