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1470 Economists Say Immigration is Good for Us

Summary:
We view the benefits of immigration as myriad: Immigration brings entrepreneurs who start new businesses that hire American workers.Immigration brings young workers who help o set the large-scale retirement of baby boomers.Immigration brings diverse skill sets that keep our workforce exible, help companies grow, and increase the productivity of American workers.Immigrants are far more likely to work in innovative, job-creating elds such as science, technology, engineering, and math that create life-improving products and drive economic growth.This is from "An Open Letter from 1,470 Economists on Immigration," published today. Among the singers are co-bloggers Bryan Caplan and Scott Sumner, and I.

Topics:
David Henderson considers the following as important:

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We view the benefits of immigration as myriad:

Immigration brings entrepreneurs who start new businesses that hire American workers.
Immigration brings young workers who help o set the large-scale retirement of baby boomers.
Immigration brings diverse skill sets that keep our workforce exible, help companies grow, and increase the productivity of American workers.
Immigrants are far more likely to work in innovative, job-creating elds such as science, technology, engineering, and math that create life-improving products and drive economic growth.


This is from "An Open Letter from 1,470 Economists on Immigration," published today. Among the singers are co-bloggers Bryan Caplan and Scott Sumner, and I.
David Henderson
David Henderson is a British economist. He was the Head of the Economics and Statistics Department at the OECD in 1984–1992. Before that he worked as an academic economist in Britain, first at Oxford (Fellow of Lincoln College) and later at University College London (Professor of Economics, 1975–1983); as a British civil servant (first as an Economic Advisor in HM Treasury, and later as Chief Economist in the Ministry of Aviation); and as a staff member of the World Bank (1969–1975). In 1985 he gave the BBC Reith Lectures, which were published in the book Innocence and Design: The Influence of Economic Ideas on Policy (Blackwell, 1986).

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