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Spot the Irony

Summary:
The following is from C.J. Ciaramella, "New York Prosecutors Gave Themselves .2 Million in Bonuses With Asset Forfeiture Funds," Reason Blog, November 28, 2017:The Suffolk County District Attorney's Office in New York doled out .25 million in bonuses to prosecutors from its asset forfeiture fund since 2012, according to records obtained by Newsday through a Freedom of Information request. Newsday reported that the funds were 0,000 more than previously reported, leading to consternation from local legislators: Bonus recipients included deputy chief homicide prosecutor Robert Biancavilla, who received a total of 8,886 between 2012 and 2017, and division chief Edward Heilig and top public

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The following is from C.J. Ciaramella, "New York Prosecutors Gave Themselves $3.2 Million in Bonuses With Asset Forfeiture Funds," Reason Blog, November 28, 2017:

The Suffolk County District Attorney's Office in New York doled out $3.25 million in bonuses to prosecutors from its asset forfeiture fund since 2012, according to records obtained by Newsday through a Freedom of Information request.

Newsday reported that the funds were $500,000 more than previously reported, leading to consternation from local legislators:

Bonus recipients included deputy chief homicide prosecutor Robert Biancavilla, who received a total of $108,886 between 2012 and 2017, and division chief Edward Heilig and top public corruption prosecutor Christopher McPartland, who each received $73,000, according to records obtained from county Comptroller John Kennedy's office through the Freedom of Information Law [...]


Task: spot the irony.

Hint: It has to do with Mr. McPartland.



David Henderson

David Henderson is a British economist. He was the Head of the Economics and Statistics Department at the OECD in 1984–1992. Before that he worked as an academic economist in Britain, first at Oxford (Fellow of Lincoln College) and later at University College London (Professor of Economics, 1975–1983); as a British civil servant (first as an Economic Advisor in HM Treasury, and later as Chief Economist in the Ministry of Aviation); and as a staff member of the World Bank (1969–1975). In 1985 he gave the BBC Reith Lectures, which were published in the book Innocence and Design: The Influence of Economic Ideas on Policy (Blackwell, 1986).

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