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Is Support for Freedom of Association Fanatical?

Summary:
In an article in which he makes a number of good points, on net defending a baker's decision not to bake a cake for a celebration that the baker objects to on religious grounds, Andrew Sullivan writes:And it is a hard case constitutionally. It pits religious and artistic freedom against civil equality and nondiscrimination. Anyone on either side who claims this is an easy call are [sic] fanatics of one kind or other.I think laws against discrimination are wrong, based on my belief in freedom of association. I've written about that many times on EconLog and so I won't repeat the arguments here. I'll simply cite a post in which I took on Michael Munger's opposition to freedom of association. So Sullivan

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In an article in which he makes a number of good points, on net defending a baker's decision not to bake a cake for a celebration that the baker objects to on religious grounds, Andrew Sullivan writes:

And it is a hard case constitutionally. It pits religious and artistic freedom against civil equality and nondiscrimination. Anyone on either side who claims this is an easy call are [sic] fanatics of one kind or other.

I think laws against discrimination are wrong, based on my belief in freedom of association. I've written about that many times on EconLog and so I won't repeat the arguments here. I'll simply cite a post in which I took on Michael Munger's opposition to freedom of association.

So Sullivan would call me a fanatic. Oh, well.



David Henderson
David Henderson is a British economist. He was the Head of the Economics and Statistics Department at the OECD in 1984–1992. Before that he worked as an academic economist in Britain, first at Oxford (Fellow of Lincoln College) and later at University College London (Professor of Economics, 1975–1983); as a British civil servant (first as an Economic Advisor in HM Treasury, and later as Chief Economist in the Ministry of Aviation); and as a staff member of the World Bank (1969–1975). In 1985 he gave the BBC Reith Lectures, which were published in the book Innocence and Design: The Influence of Economic Ideas on Policy (Blackwell, 1986).

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