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Nowrasteh on E-Verify

Summary:
I asked Alex Nowrasteh for his input on the E-Verify issue that I posted about yesterday. Here's what he wrote:E-Verify won't work because employers ignore it in states where it is required with virtually zero legal consequences (see blog post). Enforcing E-Verify laws is about as difficult as enforcing current I-9 violations. If Arizona won't enforce its own E-Verify mandate and the Feds won't enforce their own I-9 mandate, there is no good reason to expect them to enforce E-Verify. As Nowrasteh and Harper write in their policy analysis on pages 10-11, E-Verify has barely turned off the wage magnet that attracts illegal immigrants in Arizona (second link). E-Verify is a failed program that will raise hiring costs. What's worse is that its failure will prompt calls for a national

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I asked Alex Nowrasteh for his input on the E-Verify issue that I posted about yesterday.

Here's what he wrote:

E-Verify won't work because employers ignore it in states where it is required with virtually zero legal consequences (see blog post). Enforcing E-Verify laws is about as difficult as enforcing current I-9 violations. If Arizona won't enforce its own E-Verify mandate and the Feds won't enforce their own I-9 mandate, there is no good reason to expect them to enforce E-Verify.

As Nowrasteh and Harper write in their policy analysis on pages 10-11, E-Verify has barely turned off the wage magnet that attracts illegal immigrants in Arizona (second link). E-Verify is a failed program that will raise hiring costs. What's worse is that its failure will prompt calls for a national biometric identity system to plug E-Verify's "loopholes." That system's potential will be abused in short order. Best to forestall that.


The policy analysis he refers to is Alex Nowrasteh and Jim Harper, "Checking E-Verify: The Costs and Consequences of a National Worker Screening Mandate," July 7, 2015.
David Henderson
David Henderson is a British economist. He was the Head of the Economics and Statistics Department at the OECD in 1984–1992. Before that he worked as an academic economist in Britain, first at Oxford (Fellow of Lincoln College) and later at University College London (Professor of Economics, 1975–1983); as a British civil servant (first as an Economic Advisor in HM Treasury, and later as Chief Economist in the Ministry of Aviation); and as a staff member of the World Bank (1969–1975). In 1985 he gave the BBC Reith Lectures, which were published in the book Innocence and Design: The Influence of Economic Ideas on Policy (Blackwell, 1986).

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