Monday , May 28 2018
Home / EconLog Library / Oxfam or Oxgov?

Oxfam or Oxgov?

Summary:
There are two ways to close the gap [between rich and poor]. The first is to concentrate on making the poor better off. Mostly that has happened, thanks to liberalized international trade and reduced costs for shipping goods. Just as Walmart and Amazon have cut costs for Americans, the introduction of container shipping crushed transportation costs for the world. The second way to reduce inequality is to make the rich worse off. Any guess which method Oxfam's report emphasizes? "Governments should use regulation and taxation to radically reduce levels of extreme wealth," the authors conclude. This is from David R. Henderson, "A War on the Rich Won't Help the Poor," Wall Street Journal, February 8, 2018

Topics:
David Henderson considers the following as important:

This could be interesting, too:

Bryan Caplan writes Income, Sex, and Moral Equivalence

David Henderson writes Weissman Interview with Robin Hanson

David Henderson writes A War on the Rich Won’t Help the Poor

Scott Sumner writes You don’t know what you’ve got till it’s gone

There are two ways to close the gap [between rich and poor]. The first is to concentrate on making the poor better off. Mostly that has happened, thanks to liberalized international trade and reduced costs for shipping goods. Just as Walmart and Amazon have cut costs for Americans, the introduction of container shipping crushed transportation costs for the world. The second way to reduce inequality is to make the rich worse off. Any guess which method Oxfam's report emphasizes? "Governments should use regulation and taxation to radically reduce levels of extreme wealth," the authors conclude.
This is from David R. Henderson, "A War on the Rich Won't Help the Poor," Wall Street Journal, February 8, 2018 (electronic) and February 9, 2018 (print.)

In the piece, I point out how huge a budget Oxfam has--over $1 billion annually, almost half of which is financed by governments (if you include the UN as a government)--and how far it has strayed from being a group that favored free trade to help starving people in Nazi-occupied Greece during World War II.

Under my contract with the Journal, the above paragraph is about all I can quote, but I can reproduce the whole thing on March 11.



David Henderson
David Henderson is a British economist. He was the Head of the Economics and Statistics Department at the OECD in 1984–1992. Before that he worked as an academic economist in Britain, first at Oxford (Fellow of Lincoln College) and later at University College London (Professor of Economics, 1975–1983); as a British civil servant (first as an Economic Advisor in HM Treasury, and later as Chief Economist in the Ministry of Aviation); and as a staff member of the World Bank (1969–1975). In 1985 he gave the BBC Reith Lectures, which were published in the book Innocence and Design: The Influence of Economic Ideas on Policy (Blackwell, 1986).

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *