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A quick update on Italian elections

Summary:
Italians are voting in a national election today. As in many elections, there is hardly any "good" option - but plenty of bad ones. If you're interested in my take, I have a Podcast with Wall Street Journal's Mary Kissel and a piece on National Review. My gut feeling is that the Five Stars Movement will score even better than expected. They are a "populist" party, which in this case means promising ever bigger government as it came free. What however worries me the most is that the long term consequence of this election will be that the right will move even further away from any vaguely free market leaning rhetoric. Previous forecast of his impending demise have constantly proven wrong, but at age 81

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Italians are voting in a national election today. As in many elections, there is hardly any "good" option - but plenty of bad ones.

If you're interested in my take, I have a Podcast with Wall Street Journal's Mary Kissel and a piece on National Review.

My gut feeling is that the Five Stars Movement will score even better than expected. They are a "populist" party, which in this case means promising ever bigger government as it came free. What however worries me the most is that the long term consequence of this election will be that the right will move even further away from any vaguely free market leaning rhetoric. Previous forecast of his impending demise have constantly proven wrong, but at age 81 this can be the last electoral battle of Mr Berlusconi. I thought he was quite an ineffective prime minister but nowadays among right wingers he is the only one who keeps up some sort of "moderate" conservative rhetoric, instead of cultivating a sense of nostalgia for a much tightly knit society.
Circumstances ain't much better on the left side of the political spectrum.

I think Italy may end up being France without Macron. This risk has been constantly underestimated by international observers, who thought a grand coalition of sorts inevitable. But betting on populists winning but not just enough to govern seems to me a rather shortsighted approach.



Alberto Mingardi
Mingardi, one of the rising stars of European libertarianism, is the founder and Director General of the Italian free-market think tank, Instituto Bruno Leoni. His areas of interest include the history of economic thought and antitrust and healthcare systems. He is particularly well known for popularizing the work of past scholars under-appreciated by today’s libertarians. Currently an adjunct scholar at the Cato Institute, Mingardi has also worked with the Heritage Foundation, the Atlas Economic Research Foundation, the Acton Institute, and the Centre for a New Europe.

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