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AER’s Efficiency Problem

Summary:
Economics has an efficiency problem. The length of papers published in top tier journals has tripled in the past 40 years, expanding to such a degree that readers often struggle to finish them. Hmmm. An efficiency problem. Article lengths have tripled. Readers often struggle to finish them. Is there any way to solve this problem? I know it’s hard but a whole bunch of Ph.D. economists should be able to solve it. Anyone? Anyone? Bueller? Now check out the American Economic Association’s solution. HT2 Tyler Cowen.

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Economics has an efficiency problem.

The length of papers published in top tier journals has tripled in the past 40 years, expanding to such a degree that readers often struggle to finish them.

Hmmm. An efficiency problem. Article lengths have tripled. Readers often struggle to finish them.

Is there any way to solve this problem? I know it’s hard but a whole bunch of Ph.D. economists should be able to solve it.

Anyone? Anyone? Bueller?

Now check out the American Economic Association’s solution.

HT2 Tyler Cowen.

David Henderson
David Henderson is a British economist. He was the Head of the Economics and Statistics Department at the OECD in 1984–1992. Before that he worked as an academic economist in Britain, first at Oxford (Fellow of Lincoln College) and later at University College London (Professor of Economics, 1975–1983); as a British civil servant (first as an Economic Advisor in HM Treasury, and later as Chief Economist in the Ministry of Aviation); and as a staff member of the World Bank (1969–1975). In 1985 he gave the BBC Reith Lectures, which were published in the book Innocence and Design: The Influence of Economic Ideas on Policy (Blackwell, 1986).

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