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My Boise State Interview

Summary:
[embedded content] The above is my interview by one of the student journalists at Boise State University. It took place on November 4, a couple of hours before my talk. I normally highlight particular parts, but this is only about 23 minutes long. I do make a basic math error in the first few minutes when I estimate the number of readers of one of my Wall Street Journal op/eds. The interviewer told me that she hadn’t taken any economics, but I thought she did a nice job. I also talk about a typical kind of activity I did when I was a senior economist with President Reagan’s Council of Economic Advisers and where I thought I had one of my biggest impacts in an expected value sense. Towards the end, I give some advice about careers and warn of potential dangers of

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The above is my interview by one of the student journalists at Boise State University. It took place on November 4, a couple of hours before my talk.

I normally highlight particular parts, but this is only about 23 minutes long. I do make a basic math error in the first few minutes when I estimate the number of readers of one of my Wall Street Journal op/eds. The interviewer told me that she hadn’t taken any economics, but I thought she did a nice job.

I also talk about a typical kind of activity I did when I was a senior economist with President Reagan’s Council of Economic Advisers and where I thought I had one of my biggest impacts in an expected value sense.

Towards the end, I give some advice about careers and warn of potential dangers of “following your passion.”

David Henderson
David Henderson is a British economist. He was the Head of the Economics and Statistics Department at the OECD in 1984–1992. Before that he worked as an academic economist in Britain, first at Oxford (Fellow of Lincoln College) and later at University College London (Professor of Economics, 1975–1983); as a British civil servant (first as an Economic Advisor in HM Treasury, and later as Chief Economist in the Ministry of Aviation); and as a staff member of the World Bank (1969–1975). In 1985 he gave the BBC Reith Lectures, which were published in the book Innocence and Design: The Influence of Economic Ideas on Policy (Blackwell, 1986).

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