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Residential versus Commuter Colleges and Intersectionality

Summary:
In a comment on Arnold Kling’s post on intersectionality today, John Alcorn writes: A hypothesis: Ideology of intersectionality will flourish more at (residential) colleges than at the workplace, because residential colleges are structurally totalitarian institutions. Alcorn goes on to explain why. Alcorn could have substituted “commuter colleges” for “the workplace.” A friend who has been on the faculty at San Jose State University (SJSU) for about 15 years told me recently that he happened to be wandering around UC Davis, which has a large residential component, much larger than that of SJSU. He told me that the difference in the vibes between the two colleges was palpable. He said that there is relatively little political correctness at SJSU and attributed that

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In a comment on Arnold Kling’s post on intersectionality today, John Alcorn writes:

A hypothesis: Ideology of intersectionality will flourish more at (residential) colleges than at the workplace, because residential colleges are structurally totalitarian institutions.

Alcorn goes on to explain why.

Alcorn could have substituted “commuter colleges” for “the workplace.”

A friend who has been on the faculty at San Jose State University (SJSU) for about 15 years told me recently that he happened to be wandering around UC Davis, which has a large residential component, much larger than that of SJSU. He told me that the difference in the vibes between the two colleges was palpable. He said that there is relatively little political correctness at SJSU and attributed that to the fact that such a large percent of their students commute and many of them work full-time jobs and take night courses.

That’s kind of like what I experienced at the Naval Postgraduate School, for different but related reasons. The students were (and are) all full-time workers, had (and have) a median age somewhere between 30 and 33, and were in the various militaries.

David Henderson
David Henderson is a British economist. He was the Head of the Economics and Statistics Department at the OECD in 1984–1992. Before that he worked as an academic economist in Britain, first at Oxford (Fellow of Lincoln College) and later at University College London (Professor of Economics, 1975–1983); as a British civil servant (first as an Economic Advisor in HM Treasury, and later as Chief Economist in the Ministry of Aviation); and as a staff member of the World Bank (1969–1975). In 1985 he gave the BBC Reith Lectures, which were published in the book Innocence and Design: The Influence of Economic Ideas on Policy (Blackwell, 1986).

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