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Dinesh D’Souza and Critical Students Have Civilized Dialogue

Summary:
I’ve seen multiple YouTube videos of Q&A sessions when Dinesh D-Souza gives talks at universities. He often gets his share of hostile comments and I wondered how he would be treated at Stanford when he spoke there last month. So I watched the first few minutes of his speech and then jumped to Q&A. The talk is titled “The moral case for Trump’s wall.” It probably goes without saying, but I’ll say it anyway: I’m not a fan of the wall. The bottom line: The questions and comments from even the students who clearly disagree with D’Souza were uniformly civil and D’Souza responded in kind. Beyond the tone, there was a lot of good discussion. I haven’t checked all of D’Souza’s facts but if they are correct (and I already know that some of them are correct), then he

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Dinesh D’Souza and Critical Students Have Civilized Dialogue

I’ve seen multiple YouTube videos of Q&A sessions when Dinesh D-Souza gives talks at universities. He often gets his share of hostile comments and I wondered how he would be treated at Stanford when he spoke there last month. So I watched the first few minutes of his speech and then jumped to Q&A. The talk is titled “The moral case for Trump’s wall.” It probably goes without saying, but I’ll say it anyway: I’m not a fan of the wall.

The bottom line: The questions and comments from even the students who clearly disagree with D’Souza were uniformly civil and D’Souza responded in kind. Beyond the tone, there was a lot of good discussion. I haven’t checked all of D’Souza’s facts but if they are correct (and I already know that some of them are correct), then he knocked it out of the park. He said at the start of the Q&A that he wanted hostile questions. I don’t know him, but I would bet that he ended up appreciating that the tone was not that hostile. He seemed to say that at the end.

I was especially impressed by the honesty of the young woman who challenged him in the last question (at the 1:18:15 point) and D’Souza’s answers to her.

Also, I liked his discussion of young people at the 1:05:00 point.

David Henderson
David Henderson is a British economist. He was the Head of the Economics and Statistics Department at the OECD in 1984–1992. Before that he worked as an academic economist in Britain, first at Oxford (Fellow of Lincoln College) and later at University College London (Professor of Economics, 1975–1983); as a British civil servant (first as an Economic Advisor in HM Treasury, and later as Chief Economist in the Ministry of Aviation); and as a staff member of the World Bank (1969–1975). In 1985 he gave the BBC Reith Lectures, which were published in the book Innocence and Design: The Influence of Economic Ideas on Policy (Blackwell, 1986).

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