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Henderson on Bob Zadek Show

Summary:
A week ago Sunday, Charlie Deist interviewed me for almost an hour on the Bob Zadek radio show. Here’s the link. I listened to it and was generally pleased with the range of issues we got to cover: whether Steve Moore is a good fit for the Federal Reserve Board; what 2 monetary economists would be much better; why the Laffer Curve has to be right and the only issue is where we are on it; the effect of 1981 cut in tax rates on revenues paid to the feds by the top 1%; why interest rates are not a good way to judge monetary policy; Steve Moore’s early contribution to Julian Simon’s book on immigration; and what I learned from Charlie Deist that made me slightly more open to Brad DeLong.

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A week ago Sunday, Charlie Deist interviewed me for almost an hour on the Bob Zadek radio show.

Here’s the link.

I listened to it and was generally pleased with the range of issues we got to cover: whether Steve Moore is a good fit for the Federal Reserve Board; what 2 monetary economists would be much better; why the Laffer Curve has to be right and the only issue is where we are on it; the effect of 1981 cut in tax rates on revenues paid to the feds by the top 1%; why interest rates are not a good way to judge monetary policy; Steve Moore’s early contribution to Julian Simon’s book on immigration; and what I learned from Charlie Deist that made me slightly more open to Brad DeLong.

David Henderson
David Henderson is a British economist. He was the Head of the Economics and Statistics Department at the OECD in 1984–1992. Before that he worked as an academic economist in Britain, first at Oxford (Fellow of Lincoln College) and later at University College London (Professor of Economics, 1975–1983); as a British civil servant (first as an Economic Advisor in HM Treasury, and later as Chief Economist in the Ministry of Aviation); and as a staff member of the World Bank (1969–1975). In 1985 he gave the BBC Reith Lectures, which were published in the book Innocence and Design: The Influence of Economic Ideas on Policy (Blackwell, 1986).

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