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Highlights from “The Case for Free Trade”

Summary:
Earlier this month, I gave a talk at Boise State University titled “The Case for Free Trade.” Here’s the video and what follows are the highlights, with the approximate time at which they occurred. 10:00: Every law is violent. 12:00: Gains from exchange. 14:00: My famous Rita’s Friendly Oasis. 19:10: Comparative advantage. 20:30: Babe Ruth. 21:40: McCartney and Starr. 22:25: Dikembe Mutombo. 23:30: Nothing magic about borders. 24:20: Donald Trump–corn for cars. 27:50: Don Boudreaux: If real wars were like trade wars. 29:10: Trade and technology are similar. 31:30: Manufacturing jobs vs. output. 33:20: Middle class is disappearing upward. 34:40: Examples of what I get from international trade. 36:10: My Bastiat joke (which I got from the late William Breit.) 36:40:

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Earlier this month, I gave a talk at Boise State University titled “The Case for Free Trade.” Here’s the video and what follows are the highlights, with the approximate time at which they occurred.

10:00: Every law is violent.

12:00: Gains from exchange.

14:00: My famous Rita’s Friendly Oasis.

19:10: Comparative advantage.

20:30: Babe Ruth.

21:40: McCartney and Starr.

22:25: Dikembe Mutombo.

23:30: Nothing magic about borders.

24:20: Donald Trump–corn for cars.

27:50: Don Boudreaux: If real wars were like trade wars.

29:10: Trade and technology are similar.

31:30: Manufacturing jobs vs. output.

33:20: Middle class is disappearing upward.

34:40: Examples of what I get from international trade.

36:10: My Bastiat joke (which I got from the late William Breit.)

36:40: Tariffs and blowing up railroads.

37:20: Reagan’s analogy: shooting hole in boat.

37:50: Joan Robinson: boulders in harbor.

38:10: Henry George.

39:05: Bastiat’s petition of the candlemakers.

40:00: Does trade increase or decrease jobs?

44:00: Buy American?

46:00: Sugar import quotas.

49:15: Dumping.

51:00: Senator Robert Byrd.

52:30: Idaho Senator Larry Craig and Micron.

54:30: Trade deficit.

56:30: Where does the trade deficit go?

58:10: Michael Dukakis’s flub during 1988 election.

59:20: Trade promotes peace.

1:00:20: When goods don’t cross borders, armies will.

1:01:30: Doubling of trade leads to 20% decline in belligerence.

1:03:00: My Dutch Uncle advice to undergrads and high-schoolers.

A couple of minutes as about 400 students leave auditorium after end of speech.

1:08:50: First question, about government and identity.

1:11:00: Are free trade deals necessary?

1:12:00: China-U.S. trade war.

1:15:30: Is economists’ case for trade glib? The Autor evidence.

1:18:20: My free trade economist friend’s questions to steelworkers in their 50s.

1:20:00: Doritos and money.

1:21:45: Infant industry argument and The Myth of MITI.

1:24:50: Isn’t the U.S. economy strong?

1:26:50: Ben Olson: corrupt government selling resources.

1:29:10: China stealing intellectual property.

1:32:45: The role of gold in people’s financial portfolio.

1:34:00: Sergio: Child labor and tradeoff between material and spiritual.

1:39:30: Linda Symms: Trade sanctions on Iran and people are smarter than cats.

1:41:45: The philosophical case against patents and copyrights.

1:43:45: Bitcoin.

David Henderson
David Henderson is a British economist. He was the Head of the Economics and Statistics Department at the OECD in 1984–1992. Before that he worked as an academic economist in Britain, first at Oxford (Fellow of Lincoln College) and later at University College London (Professor of Economics, 1975–1983); as a British civil servant (first as an Economic Advisor in HM Treasury, and later as Chief Economist in the Ministry of Aviation); and as a staff member of the World Bank (1969–1975). In 1985 he gave the BBC Reith Lectures, which were published in the book Innocence and Design: The Influence of Economic Ideas on Policy (Blackwell, 1986).

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