Monday , July 22 2019
Home / EconLog Library / Jake Tapper Doesn’t Understand Freedom

Jake Tapper Doesn’t Understand Freedom

Summary:
We shouldn’t get to a place where there are people yelling from the rafters that because you have been successful, you are a bad person and we’re going to be punitive to you. That’s, to me, the antithesis of the spirit of the country.” So said Starbucks chairman emeritus Howard Schultz. Sounds right to me. And what is CNN anchor Jake Tapper’s reaction? The free speech part or the freedom of assembly part? Neither, Jake. To argue against people yelling attacks from the rafters is not to attack their freedom of speech or assembly.

Topics:
David Henderson considers the following as important:

This could be interesting, too:

Scott Sumner writes Public opinion regarding cash for kidneys

Pierre Lemieux writes A Delight in Despotism: The Case of Vaping

Sarah Skwire writes What’s in a Name?

Alberto Mingardi writes Why not ‘individualism’?

We shouldn’t get to a place where there are people yelling from the rafters that because you have been successful, you are a bad person and we’re going to be punitive to you. That’s, to me, the antithesis of the spirit of the country.”

So said Starbucks chairman emeritus Howard Schultz.

Sounds right to me.

And what is CNN anchor Jake Tapper’s reaction?

The free speech part or the freedom of assembly part?

Neither, Jake.

To argue against people yelling attacks from the rafters is not to attack their freedom of speech or assembly.

David Henderson
David Henderson is a British economist. He was the Head of the Economics and Statistics Department at the OECD in 1984–1992. Before that he worked as an academic economist in Britain, first at Oxford (Fellow of Lincoln College) and later at University College London (Professor of Economics, 1975–1983); as a British civil servant (first as an Economic Advisor in HM Treasury, and later as Chief Economist in the Ministry of Aviation); and as a staff member of the World Bank (1969–1975). In 1985 he gave the BBC Reith Lectures, which were published in the book Innocence and Design: The Influence of Economic Ideas on Policy (Blackwell, 1986).

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *