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Matt Stoller Responds

Summary:
Recently I posted a critique of Matt Stoller’s nasty attack on the late Aaron Director. Stoller didn’t just challenge Director’s views; he suggested not too subtly that Director changed his views because he was paid to do so. I found that highly implausible and because of that charge and the whole tone of Stoller’s post, I called his article a hatchet job. Stefano Feltri of the site where Stoller’s article was published asked permission to rerun my post. I agreed and he did so, along with an answer by Stoller. My post and Stoller’s answer are here. I’ll let you judge the quality of Stoller’s response.

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Matt Stoller Responds

Recently I posted a critique of Matt Stoller’s nasty attack on the late Aaron Director. Stoller didn’t just challenge Director’s views; he suggested not too subtly that Director changed his views because he was paid to do so.

I found that highly implausible and because of that charge and the whole tone of Stoller’s post, I called his article a hatchet job.

Stefano Feltri of the site where Stoller’s article was published asked permission to rerun my post. I agreed and he did so, along with an answer by Stoller.

My post and Stoller’s answer are here. I’ll let you judge the quality of Stoller’s response.

David Henderson
David Henderson is a British economist. He was the Head of the Economics and Statistics Department at the OECD in 1984–1992. Before that he worked as an academic economist in Britain, first at Oxford (Fellow of Lincoln College) and later at University College London (Professor of Economics, 1975–1983); as a British civil servant (first as an Economic Advisor in HM Treasury, and later as Chief Economist in the Ministry of Aviation); and as a staff member of the World Bank (1969–1975). In 1985 he gave the BBC Reith Lectures, which were published in the book Innocence and Design: The Influence of Economic Ideas on Policy (Blackwell, 1986).

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