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A Missed Opportunity for Dianne Feinstein

Summary:
Presumably some of you have seen the video of the group of children, and an adult or two, having a conversation with Dianne Feinstein. I never thought I would say anything nice about her but I do appreciate two things. First, Senator Feinstein argued back when challenged. A lot of Democratic politicians don’t seem to have the guts to do even that. Second, I like the part (at about the 1:00 point in the short video) where the girl says “We’re the people who voted [for] you.” Feinstein asks “How old are you?” The girl answers “I’m 16, I can’t vote.” Feinstein replies “Well you didn’t vote for me.” In the rest of it, though, Feinstein pulls rank, reminding them that she is much more experienced (true) and knows more (almost certainly true.) But she could have done

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Presumably some of you have seen the video of the group of children, and an adult or two, having a conversation with Dianne Feinstein. I never thought I would say anything nice about her but I do appreciate two things.

First, Senator Feinstein argued back when challenged. A lot of Democratic politicians don’t seem to have the guts to do even that.

Second, I like the part (at about the 1:00 point in the short video) where the girl says “We’re the people who voted [for] you.” Feinstein asks “How old are you?” The girl answers “I’m 16, I can’t vote.” Feinstein replies “Well you didn’t vote for me.”

In the rest of it, though, Feinstein pulls rank, reminding them that she is much more experienced (true) and knows more (almost certainly true.)

But she could have done better. Here’s what she could have done. I’ll give the questions. Of course, there would be follow-up questions that would depend on the answers the children gave.

Do you have any idea what the Green New Deal would cost? What if it cost $50 trillion, which is more than double the output of the whole U.S. economy this year? Would you still want to do it? Let’s say that you asked your parents to buy a new wide-screen TV; what if the cost of that TV were $10,000? Do you think your parents would buy it? Shouldn’t we look at the cost of programs before deciding whether to implement them?

Do you think any of you would ever want to fly to Europe? How would you feel if ten years from now the federal government prevented anyone from ever flying to Europe or to anywhere else? Would you feel upset that you would never ever after that be able to fly?

You say that you’re the ones who would be affected. That’s true. You’ll be around much longer than me. If the whole of the GND were adopted or even if some major parts were adopted, what would be the effect on world temperatures?

You say that some scientists have said that we have 12 years to turn this around. Which scientists said that? Are you aware that most scientists who have studied the issue disagree with that?

HT2 Charley Hooper.

David Henderson
David Henderson is a British economist. He was the Head of the Economics and Statistics Department at the OECD in 1984–1992. Before that he worked as an academic economist in Britain, first at Oxford (Fellow of Lincoln College) and later at University College London (Professor of Economics, 1975–1983); as a British civil servant (first as an Economic Advisor in HM Treasury, and later as Chief Economist in the Ministry of Aviation); and as a staff member of the World Bank (1969–1975). In 1985 he gave the BBC Reith Lectures, which were published in the book Innocence and Design: The Influence of Economic Ideas on Policy (Blackwell, 1986).

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