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A Question on Victims of Communism Day 2019

Summary:
George Mason University law professor Ilya Somin, over at The Volokh Conspiracy, makes the point that May 1 should be a day to honor victims of Communism. I agree. So to honor that day, here are some questions. First, some background. I carry old Wall Street Journal puzzles with me when I travel and I was doing one on the way from LAX to Newark last Wednesday. Here’s the clue: “Pre-October Revolution rulers.” The answer is a word with 5 letters. The answer is literally correct, but fundamentally misleading, and in a very bad way. Question 1: What is the answer the Journal editor, Mike Shenk, wanted you to answer? (I’m not saying that he did this on purpose; he might simply be ignorant.) Question 2: Why is it misleading? Bonus question: Why is it misleading in a

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George Mason University law professor Ilya Somin, over at The Volokh Conspiracy, makes the point that May 1 should be a day to honor victims of Communism. I agree.

So to honor that day, here are some questions. First, some background. I carry old Wall Street Journal puzzles with me when I travel and I was doing one on the way from LAX to Newark last Wednesday. Here’s the clue: “Pre-October Revolution rulers.” The answer is a word with 5 letters.

The answer is literally correct, but fundamentally misleading, and in a very bad way.

Question 1: What is the answer the Journal editor, Mike Shenk, wanted you to answer? (I’m not saying that he did this on purpose; he might simply be ignorant.)

Question 2: Why is it misleading?

Bonus question: Why is it misleading in a bad way?

David Henderson
David Henderson is a British economist. He was the Head of the Economics and Statistics Department at the OECD in 1984–1992. Before that he worked as an academic economist in Britain, first at Oxford (Fellow of Lincoln College) and later at University College London (Professor of Economics, 1975–1983); as a British civil servant (first as an Economic Advisor in HM Treasury, and later as Chief Economist in the Ministry of Aviation); and as a staff member of the World Bank (1969–1975). In 1985 he gave the BBC Reith Lectures, which were published in the book Innocence and Design: The Influence of Economic Ideas on Policy (Blackwell, 1986).

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