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Dalibor Rohac on Brexit

Summary:
While I do perhaps naively believe that Boris Johnson is the right man to put lipstick on a pig, that is: to trim some sort of agreements between the EU and the UK, Dalibor Rohac thinks that we should prepare for a No Deal Brexit. Dalibor has lived in England and is a fine observer of European matters. There are several interesting points in his piece but let me highlight a couple. On the one hand, he thinks the European Union has no margin to work a new agreement out for “geopolitical” reasons: “The current era of great-power competition requires the EU, especially if weakened by Brexit, to build credibility and a reputation for a certain degree of ruthlessness for being able to make decisions and stick with them even when it is temporarily inconvenient”. On the

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While I do perhaps naively believe that Boris Johnson is the right man to put lipstick on a pig, that is: to trim some sort of agreements between the EU and the UK, Dalibor Rohac thinks that we should prepare for a No Deal Brexit. Dalibor has lived in England and is a fine observer of European matters.

There are several interesting points in his piece but let me highlight a couple. On the one hand, he thinks the European Union has no margin to work a new agreement out for “geopolitical” reasons: “The current era of great-power competition requires the EU, especially if weakened by Brexit, to build credibility and a reputation for a certain degree of ruthlessness for being able to make decisions and stick with them even when it is temporarily inconvenient”. On the other, he maintains that Johnson will be able to extract political value out of a hard Brexit, basically because it is not going to be _as disastrous_ in the short term as Remainers have so far prophesized: “Will Brexit be disruptive and costly? Of course it will. However, if it is expected and planned for, the disruption will not take the form of unmitigated chaos on October 31. Planes will continue to fly, there will be food on the shelves of supermarkets, and the Eurostar will not come to a standstill halfway between Dover and Calais.”

I recommend the whole piece.

Alberto Mingardi
Mingardi, one of the rising stars of European libertarianism, is the founder and Director General of the Italian free-market think tank, Instituto Bruno Leoni. His areas of interest include the history of economic thought and antitrust and healthcare systems. He is particularly well known for popularizing the work of past scholars under-appreciated by today’s libertarians. Currently an adjunct scholar at the Cato Institute, Mingardi has also worked with the Heritage Foundation, the Atlas Economic Research Foundation, the Acton Institute, and the Centre for a New Europe.

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