Sunday , March 29 2020
Home / David Henderson /Pinch Me

Pinch Me

Summary:
If you wore [sic] born and grew up in the U.S., Canada, Australia or any other country considered “developed,” there are probably a lot of things you take for granted on a daily basis. Things like clean drinking water, big grocery stores, and even mirrors. But for people who grew up in developing countries and then left, many aspects of life in the developed world might come as a shock. So writes May Wilkerson in “35 people who moved from the developing world to richer countries share what shocked them the most,” somecards.com, February 13. All 35 items are worth reading. They remind me of things that most of us take for granted, but that make life so easy. You’ll notice how few of the 35 items are about cell phones and other very modern conveniences and how many

Topics:
David Henderson considers the following as important: , , , , ,

This could be interesting, too:

David Henderson writes Politicians in Boarding Houses

Scott Sumner writes Capitalism is making the Chinese both better and happier

Scott Sumner writes Yes, the system is rigged. But how?

Sarah Skwire writes Count Dracula and the Chamber of Wonders

Pinch Me

If you wore [sic] born and grew up in the U.S., Canada, Australia or any other country considered “developed,” there are probably a lot of things you take for granted on a daily basis. Things like clean drinking water, big grocery stores, and even mirrors. But for people who grew up in developing countries and then left, many aspects of life in the developed world might come as a shock.

So writes May Wilkerson in “35 people who moved from the developing world to richer countries share what shocked them the most,” somecards.com, February 13.

All 35 items are worth reading. They remind me of things that most of us take for granted, but that make life so easy. You’ll notice how few of the 35 items are about cell phones and other very modern conveniences and how many are about simple things like toilet paper, well-stocked supermarkets, and, especially, lack of crime and increased personal safety.

I’ve always taken personal safety for granted, except for the months following two episodes: (1) December 1978 when someone robbing my house in Rochester, NY jumped out of a second story window of my house but just before doing so yelled, “I’m gonna kill you.” (2) November 1979, when my apartment in Oakland, CA was burglarized and the burglars might have been there when I got home. (I didn’t wait around to find out.)

Also interesting is the appreciation of people of various colors.

HT2 Jonathan Meer.

David Henderson
David Henderson is a British economist. He was the Head of the Economics and Statistics Department at the OECD in 1984–1992. Before that he worked as an academic economist in Britain, first at Oxford (Fellow of Lincoln College) and later at University College London (Professor of Economics, 1975–1983); as a British civil servant (first as an Economic Advisor in HM Treasury, and later as Chief Economist in the Ministry of Aviation); and as a staff member of the World Bank (1969–1975). In 1985 he gave the BBC Reith Lectures, which were published in the book Innocence and Design: The Influence of Economic Ideas on Policy (Blackwell, 1986).

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *