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Flintstones Without the Nice Tune

Summary:
I just finished watching an excellent 45-minute discussion led by my Hoover colleague Scott Atlas. The two participants he questioned were Hoover colleagues Russ Roberts and Ayaan Hirsi Ali. The topic was Hoover’s Human Prosperity Project and both had a lot of great insights and great lines. Among the lines that stood out was one from Ali. If I remember correctly, she said it in the context of her story about growing up in Somalia and seeing her mother lining up for food for hours after Somalia went the socialist route under Siad Barre. She explained that whereas socialism is utopian and aims at nice goals like equality and prosperity for everyone, it ends up as “The Flintstones without the nice tune.”

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Flintstones Without the Nice Tune

I just finished watching an excellent 45-minute discussion led by my Hoover colleague Scott Atlas. The two participants he questioned were Hoover colleagues Russ Roberts and Ayaan Hirsi Ali.

The topic was Hoover’s Human Prosperity Project and both had a lot of great insights and great lines.

Among the lines that stood out was one from Ali. If I remember correctly, she said it in the context of her story about growing up in Somalia and seeing her mother lining up for food for hours after Somalia went the socialist route under Siad Barre. She explained that whereas socialism is utopian and aims at nice goals like equality and prosperity for everyone, it ends up as “The Flintstones without the nice tune.”

David Henderson
David Henderson is a British economist. He was the Head of the Economics and Statistics Department at the OECD in 1984–1992. Before that he worked as an academic economist in Britain, first at Oxford (Fellow of Lincoln College) and later at University College London (Professor of Economics, 1975–1983); as a British civil servant (first as an Economic Advisor in HM Treasury, and later as Chief Economist in the Ministry of Aviation); and as a staff member of the World Bank (1969–1975). In 1985 he gave the BBC Reith Lectures, which were published in the book Innocence and Design: The Influence of Economic Ideas on Policy (Blackwell, 1986).

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