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Monnery on Hong Kong and Cuba

Summary:
On our sister website, Law and Liberty, I’ve reviewed Neil Monnery’s A Tale of Two Economies. Monnery was interviewed by Russ Roberts on the occasion of the publication of his previous book, an engaging biography of John Cowperthwaite, whom he sees as the “architect” of Hong Kong’s prosperity. In this book, he compares Cowperhwaite with Ernesto “Che” Guevara. One was the man behind the key economic choices in Hong Kong, the other the man behind the key economic choices in Cuba. The two countries both “sit at a latitude of around 22 or 23 degree north, just south of the Tropic of Cancer.” In spite of geography, “each came to represent the beacon of a peculiar political theory in the 1960s and after: Hong Kong, what Milton Friedman and many others called an

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On our sister website, Law and Liberty, I’ve reviewed Neil Monnery’s A Tale of Two Economies.

Monnery was interviewed by Russ Roberts on the occasion of the publication of his previous book, an engaging biography of John Cowperthwaite, whom he sees as the “architect” of Hong Kong’s prosperity.

Monnery on Hong Kong and Cuba

In this book, he compares Cowperhwaite with Ernesto “Che” Guevara. One was the man behind the key economic choices in Hong Kong, the other the man behind the key economic choices in Cuba. The two countries both “sit at a latitude of around 22 or 23 degree north, just south of the Tropic of Cancer.” In spite of geography, “each came to represent the beacon of a peculiar political theory in the 1960s and after: Hong Kong, what Milton Friedman and many others called an experiment in “free enterprise and free markets”; and Cuba, the last bastion of socialism after the Soviet Union faltered and China reformed.”

Monnery’s book is a fun, engaging read. I highly recommend him, if you are searching for a book to persuade a friend of the benefits of free enterprise.

Alberto Mingardi
Mingardi, one of the rising stars of European libertarianism, is the founder and Director General of the Italian free-market think tank, Instituto Bruno Leoni. His areas of interest include the history of economic thought and antitrust and healthcare systems. He is particularly well known for popularizing the work of past scholars under-appreciated by today’s libertarians. Currently an adjunct scholar at the Cato Institute, Mingardi has also worked with the Heritage Foundation, the Atlas Economic Research Foundation, the Acton Institute, and the Centre for a New Europe.

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