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Without Government, Who Would Stop Us from Feeding Poor People?

Summary:
In September, a group of residents in Fort Worth, Texas, decided to do something to combat growing hunger in their city. They placed a refrigerator on a city street and stocked it with food that anyone in need could take and eat. For free. Months later, though, their efforts are in jeopardy due to an unwelcome combination of outdated laws and overzealous regulators. So begins a story from Baylen Linnekin, “Fort Worth Regulators Target Community Fridges Providing Free Food for People in Need,” Reason, January 16, 2020. Fort Worth regulators have found an obscure law that allows them to prevent people from feeding their fellow humans.

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Without Government, Who Would Stop Us from Feeding Poor People?

In September, a group of residents in Fort Worth, Texas, decided to do something to combat growing hunger in their city. They placed a refrigerator on a city street and stocked it with food that anyone in need could take and eat. For free. Months later, though, their efforts are in jeopardy due to an unwelcome combination of outdated laws and overzealous regulators.

So begins a story from Baylen Linnekin, “Fort Worth Regulators Target Community Fridges Providing Free Food for People in Need,” Reason, January 16, 2020.

Fort Worth regulators have found an obscure law that allows them to prevent people from feeding their fellow humans.

David Henderson
David R. Henderson (born November 21, 1950) is a Canadian-born American economist and author who moved to the United States in 1972 and became a U.S. citizen in 1986, serving on President Ronald Reagan's Council of Economic Advisers from 1982 to 1984.[1] A research fellow at Stanford University's Hoover Institution[2] since 1990, he took a teaching position with the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California in 1984, and is now a full professor of economics.[3]

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