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Henderson on Good and Bad Inequality

Summary:
My Policy Ed video for the Hoover Institution’s PolicyEd video series is out. Here it is on YouTube. [embedded content] A summary of the 4-minute video: Both good and bad income inequality exist. Good inequality comes from entrepreneurial innovation that improves the lives of consumers, even if the inventor gets wealthy. On the other hand, using political muscle to get rich leads to bad inequality, as it comes at the expense of consumers. It is vital to have government policies that can distinguish between good and bad inequality to increase innovation, strengthen the economy, and ultimately give people more incentive to innovate. And notice the 2 people I use to illustrate each. One of them is in the picture above. Can you guess who it is?

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Henderson on Good and Bad Inequality

My Policy Ed video for the Hoover Institution’s PolicyEd video series is out. Here it is on YouTube.

A summary of the 4-minute video:

Both good and bad income inequality exist. Good inequality comes from entrepreneurial innovation that improves the lives of consumers, even if the inventor gets wealthy. On the other hand, using political muscle to get rich leads to bad inequality, as it comes at the expense of consumers. It is vital to have government policies that can distinguish between good and bad inequality to increase innovation, strengthen the economy, and ultimately give people more incentive to innovate.

And notice the 2 people I use to illustrate each. One of them is in the picture above. Can you guess who it is?

David Henderson
David R. Henderson (born November 21, 1950) is a Canadian-born American economist and author who moved to the United States in 1972 and became a U.S. citizen in 1986, serving on President Ronald Reagan's Council of Economic Advisers from 1982 to 1984.[1] A research fellow at Stanford University's Hoover Institution[2] since 1990, he took a teaching position with the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California in 1984, and is now a full professor of economics.[3]

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