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Two Questions on Sunkara’s Book

Summary:
One of the readings in the colloquium on socialism last weekend was an excerpt from Bhaskar Sunkara, The Socialist Manifesto. In preparing my questions for discussion, I highlighted two sentences from his book. Here they are, along with the question I asked about each. On page 234, Sunkara writes, “The socialist record on oppression is uneven but still better than that of any other political tradition.” Is there any evidence from the 20th century we could look at to evaluate his claim? And: On page 236, Sunkara writes, “The socialist premise is clear: at their core people want dignity, respect, and a fair shot at a good life.” Do any other ideologies share this premise?

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Two Questions on Sunkara’s Book

One of the readings in the colloquium on socialism last weekend was an excerpt from Bhaskar Sunkara, The Socialist Manifesto.

In preparing my questions for discussion, I highlighted two sentences from his book.

Here they are, along with the question I asked about each.

On page 234, Sunkara writes, “The socialist record on oppression is uneven but still better than that of any other political tradition.” Is there any evidence from the 20th century we could look at to evaluate his claim?

And:

On page 236, Sunkara writes, “The socialist premise is clear: at their core people want dignity, respect, and a fair shot at a good life.” Do any other ideologies share this premise?

David Henderson
David R. Henderson (born November 21, 1950) is a Canadian-born American economist and author who moved to the United States in 1972 and became a U.S. citizen in 1986, serving on President Ronald Reagan's Council of Economic Advisers from 1982 to 1984.[1] A research fellow at Stanford University's Hoover Institution[2] since 1990, he took a teaching position with the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California in 1984, and is now a full professor of economics.[3]

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