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The FDA’s Extreme Innumeracy

Summary:
Seriously, FDA? The Food and Drug Administration decided yesterday to strictly limit”who can receive Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 vaccine.” Why? Because of “the ongoing risk of rare but serious blood clots.” How rare but serious? Matthew Perrone and Lauren Neergaard, in “FDA restricts J&J’s COVID-19 due to blood clot risk,” msn.com, May 5, 2022, write: Federal scientists identified 60 cases, including nine that were fatal, as of mid-March. That amounts to one blood clot case per 3.23 million J&J shots administered, the FDA said Thursday. The vaccine will carry a starker warning about potential “long-term and debilitating health consequences” of the side effect. Since 9 out of the 60 were fatal, that amounts to 1 death from a blood clot out of 21.5 million

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The FDA’s Extreme Innumeracy

Seriously, FDA?

The Food and Drug Administration decided yesterday to strictly limit”who can receive Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 vaccine.” Why? Because of “the ongoing risk of rare but serious blood clots.”

How rare but serious? Matthew Perrone and Lauren Neergaard, in “FDA restricts J&J’s COVID-19 due to blood clot risk,” msn.com, May 5, 2022, write:

Federal scientists identified 60 cases, including nine that were fatal, as of mid-March. That amounts to one blood clot case per 3.23 million J&J shots administered, the FDA said Thursday. The vaccine will carry a starker warning about potential “long-term and debilitating health consequences” of the side effect.

Since 9 out of the 60 were fatal, that amounts to 1 death from a blood clot out of 21.5 million shots.

What’s next? The Department of Transportation telling us not to drive because there are 1.34 fatalities for every 100 million vehicles traveled?

David Henderson
David R. Henderson (born November 21, 1950) is a Canadian-born American economist and author who moved to the United States in 1972 and became a U.S. citizen in 1986, serving on President Ronald Reagan's Council of Economic Advisers from 1982 to 1984.[1] A research fellow at Stanford University's Hoover Institution[2] since 1990, he took a teaching position with the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California in 1984, and is now a full professor of economics.[3]

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