Monday , September 25 2017
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The Hero Problem

Summary:
When the state and its media bullhorns refer to armed government workers – law enforcers – as “heroes,” it’s a sign the hour is getting late. When most people don’t draw back and spit coffee all over the keyboard at the idea, it’s minutes to midnight. How did it become “heroic” to enforce laws? And if it is “heroic” to enforce laws then – ipso facto –  the East German Stasi, the Soviet GRU and NKVD were “heroic” also. Right? Current Prices on popular forms of Silver Bullion Crickets, usually. Well, cognitive dissonance. Too many people don’t make such connections; see the concept behind the particular. “Law enforcement,” like references to the United States as the “Homeland” (mein Fuhrer! I can walk!) are relatively recent rust spots on the American quarter

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When the state and its media bullhorns refer to armed government workers – law enforcers – as “heroes,” it’s a sign the hour is getting late.

When most people don’t draw back and spit coffee all over the keyboard at the idea, it’s minutes to midnight.

How did it become “heroic” to enforce laws?

And if it is “heroic” to enforce laws then – ipso facto  the East German Stasi, the Soviet GRU and NKVD were “heroic” also.

Right?

Current Prices on popular forms of Silver Bullion

Crickets, usually.

Well, cognitive dissonance. Too many people don’t make such connections; see the concept behind the particular.

“Law enforcement,” like references to the United States as the “Homeland” (mein Fuhrer! I can walk!) are relatively recent rust spots on the American quarter panel; visible evidence of the underlying rot.

This is their own term, too. It is what they do – by definition.

Well, at least they are honest about it. Meanwhile, the populace in general still regards them as being there to “protect and serve,” the “thin blue line.” Both are false – and ridiculous – notions.

First, they are not there to to protect. This is not their job.

The Supreme Court has very explicitly stated this. The job of law enforcement is (wait for it) to enforce laws.

Law enforcers are under no legal obligation to protect anything – or anyone.

Indeed – hark, Officer Safety! – they are most concerned with protecting themselves, if anything. To the nth degree. Which is certainly understandable – we all value ourselves highly. But looking out for Numero Uno isn’t “heroic.”

A hero puts his own self at risk for the sake of others. Law enforcers go to great pains to not do this. The state they work for esteems their lives – their safety (whether a threat is real or imagined) far more than our lives and safety.

Note that a “hero’s” life is literally – legally – more valuable than our lives. This extends even to dogs. A “hero” can murder a family pet, without reason (beyond “I feared for my safety”) and he may be reprimanded. A citizen who defends himself against a police dog and slay the animal can be charged wth murder of a “law enforcement officer” – and will be prosecuted with extreme prejudice.

Eric Peters
Eric started out writing about cars for mainstream media outlets such as The Washington Times, Detroit News and Free Press, Investors Business Daily, The American Spectator, National Review, The Chicago Tribune and Wall Street Journal.

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