Friday , July 19 2019
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2019 VW Beetle Final

Summary:
In 1979, VW stopped selling the Beetle – at least, in the United States. Uncle would not allow it. The car designed back in the 1930s could not meet the crashworthiness and emissions standards of the ‘70s. Plus, there was a lot of very heavy competition from newer – and more modern – economy cars from Japan. These may not have had the Beetle’s charm – or lawn mower simplicity. But they did have working heaters, among other draws. Fast forward. In 1998 VW brought the Beetle back – but it was a very different Beetle. Not air-cooled, or rear-engined. With heated seats – as well as climate control AC. It was iconic looking – but not classic driving. People loved it – all over again. But the love waned as the Beetle aged – and was

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In 1979, VW stopped selling the Beetle – at least, in the United States.

Uncle would not allow it.

The car designed back in the 1930s could not meet the crashworthiness and emissions standards of the ‘70s. Plus, there was a lot of very heavy competition from newer – and more modern – economy cars from Japan.

These may not have had the Beetle’s charm – or lawn mower simplicity. But they did have working heaters, among other draws.

Fast forward.

In 1998 VW brought the Beetle back – but it was a very different Beetle. Not air-cooled, or rear-engined. With heated seats – as well as climate control AC.

It was iconic looking – but not classic driving. People loved it – all over again.

But the love waned as the Beetle aged – and was once again overtaken by more modern rivals, many of them cheaper.

History does repeat – even if the engine isn’t in the same place.

What It Is

The Beetle – current iteration – is basically a Golf, VW’s compact hatchback, with a body that looks like a classic Beetle’s.

Mechanically, the current Beetle shares no common parts with the iconic original Beetle that first appeared back in the ’30s – and which VW continued to make and sell in other countries all the way through 2003.

The engine’s up front – and it’s water-cooled – unlike the original, which was rear-engined and air-cooled. It has six gears instead of just four. And it gets to 60 in less than 30 seconds.

But both the classic and the modern Beetle have one thing in common: They are compact-sized two-doors with instantly recognizable silhouettes that set them apart from the run-of-the-mill.

Base price for a 2019 coupe is $20,895; a top-of-the-line Final Edition SEL stickers for $25,995.

A convertible Beetle is available, too. They list for $25,995 to start – topping out at $29,995 for a Final Edition.

Eric Peters
Eric Peters is a freelance car/bike/political columnist. He escaped the corporate-owned media Big Boys years ago. Without the censorship of the corporate tools

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